Reports of Maj. Gen. John H. Forney, C. S. Army, Commanding Division.
MAY 19-JULY 4, 1863.--The Siege of Vicksburg, Miss.
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/2 [S# 37]

HEADQUARTERS FORNEY'S DIVISION,
May 19, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON.

        GENERAL: Three regiments and one battalion of General Hébert's brigade repelled the attack of the enemy to-day, commencing at 2.30 p.m., advancing in three lines. They succeeded in getting immediately under the parapet of the battery, in position on the Graveyard road. Two colors were left within 10 feet of the works, but were not taken, on account of the very severe fire of the enemy's sharpshooters, and were either destroyed or taken away after dark.
        Three attacks were made. In the first they were driven back; in the second the same result, and in the third they reached the parapet, as stated above. About 50 will cover the losses in front of this position, and perhaps one-fourth of these family.
        Six batteries of theirs are now bearing immediately on the work on the Jackson road, and others on the Baldwin's Ferry road; one at the Ferguson house; another this side of the Ferguson house, and on the right of the railroad. I think they are moving artillery between the two roads. These batteries have kept up a continuous fire all day upon the works between the roads. Our losses among the troops between the roads will amount to about 37.
        Their pickets to-night are advancing to the right of the Jackson road, and within 200 yards of our lines, and a line of battle was discovered late this evening in rear of these skirmishers. Our pickets, concealed, heard them say, "They would be in our lines in five hours." I have just recalled the Fortieth Mississippi, sent to Graveyard Hill this morning, and will place it in its old position.
        The Parrott gun taken from the work on the Jackson road to the Graveyard Hill was moved by General Shoup to the left. I request that the chief of artillery be requested to examine that point. Our men are at work throwing up traverses, &c., making themselves more secure. The two guns at Graveyard Hill were dismounted; one at least is reported as rendered unserviceable; there is some doubt as regards the other. My men are in excellent spirits, and will behave as they should.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-general.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
May 22, 1863--12.15 [p.m.].

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: This is just received from General Moore:
        Enemy repulsed from my right. Attacking again or advancing. Captured one stand of colors. Seem to have been driven out by Lee, though colors were in his works. Would like two regiments more.
        Enemy attack from time to time. Hébert on Jackson road, to right and left, and also toward Graveyard road. I cannot, therefore, reenforce Moore from Hébert. Green was sent to re-enforce Lee. We have now no reserve.
        Have sent to Generals Smith and Bowen for re-enforcements.
        The men are standing to the work.

Very respectfully,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major. Genera1.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
May 22, 1863--2.45 p.m.

Major MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        Enemy have been repulsed on Jackson road; now forming against General Hébert's left. The re-enforcements from General Bowen (one regiment) are there. A regiment from General Smith is near the point threatened. I cannot, therefore, send any troops to Generals Moore, or Lee. General Moore has now a portion of Green's brigade with him; one regiment left with General Lee.
        I send Major [S.] Croom in with the answers from General Moore and Colonel [A.] Smith, of his brigade.

I am, major, very respectfully,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General.


MAY 22, 1863--2 to 7 o'clock [p.m.].

Major MEMMINGER.

        General Moore has repulsed the enemy again on his right. This has been the most severe fighting. The battery of the enemy has nearly demolished his works. He will attempt at once to take the battery. I have sent him the Seventeenth Louisiana and half of Twenty-eighth [Twenty-ninth] Louisiana, sent me by General Smith.
        We have also had hard fighting on my left, and on Jackson road. All quiet at these points now.

Very truly,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General.

[P. S.]--General Moore is again hotly engaged.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION, May 23, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report (briefly) yesterday's operations. The sharpshooters and artillery of the enemy opened on my entire front early in the morning, and kept up an incessant fire during the whole day. Serious attacks were made and repulsed at three points on the line, namely:
        1. On my extreme right (General Moore), and extending toward General Lee's front; two attacks; the first at 11 a.m. and the second at 5 p.m.
        The enemy succeeded in getting in the ditch of the work on right of Baldwin's Ferry road. Shell with five-second fuses were thrown over on them. They did not, however, retire till after dark. The Second Texas (Col. Ashbel Smith) held this work, and captured a stand of colors, with the color-bearer. The road in front of this position was left covered with the dead bodies of the enemy. This position was most vigorously assailed, and the last assault was of longer duration than the assaults at the other points.
        2. The works immediately on right and left of the Jackson road (General Hébert) were twice assailed. The troops making the assault were apparently of the Irish nation, as they carried the green flag, with golden harp and border, of that people. They advanced in platoon front, with scaling ladders. The enemy also succeeded in getting into the ditch in front of the work here, but were soon driven out. The enemy's loss was very heavy, and ours also was quite severe, particularly among the cannoneers.
        3. On my left (General Hébert), and extending to General Smith's right, on the Graveyard road, three distinct and serious assaults were made. Each time the enemy was repulsed with great loss. The enemy advanced in three or more lines of battle. The first advanced as sharpshooters. This line kept up a constant fire over the parapets, under cover of which the second and third lines advanced.
        The fire of the enemy's artillery has damaged our works at all three of these points considerably. Two of the 20-pounder Parrott guns on this line are disabled, and the 24-pounder siege gun on the Baldwin's Ferry road was disabled early yesterday morning. At the work on the right of the Baldwin's Ferry road the guns have been removed and the embrasures filled up. It is with great difficulty that we can procure spades and shovels to repair the damage done during the day. New works will have to be constructed on the :Baldwin's Ferry road, and I earnestly request that spades and shovels be sent. The enemy remains in force opposite these three points.
        The following are the casualties reported: I n Moore's brigade--killed, 21; wounded, 56. In Hébert's brigade--killed, Major Yates, Thirty-sixth Mississippi Regiment; Captain Ryan, Twenty-first Louisiana Regiment; Lieutenant Lehman, Twenty-third [Twenty-second] Louisiana Regiment, and 18 enlisted men. Wounded, 2 lieutenants and 37 enlisted men. Total in the division killed, 42; wounded, 117.
        Everything is unusually quiet along the lines this morning, the enemy only firing occasionally with artillery and a few sharpshooters.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General.

P. S.--The troops on the entire line are in fine spirits. Their work will be well done.


HEADQUARTERS FORNEY'S DIVISION,
May 24, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report the following as the result of yesterday's operations along my line:
        On my right everything was unusually quiet. On the left there was occasional artillery firing and some sharpshooting, which was somewhat annoying and injurious. The enemy seem to be posting new batteries both on the Baldwin's Ferry and Jackson roads, from which they will probably soon open a heavy fire on our works.
        The following are the casualties reported: In Moore's brigade--2 killed and 10 wounded. In Hébert's brigade--killed, Captain Graves, Thirty-eighth Mississippi Regiment; Lieutenant Murrell, Thirty-sixth Mississippi Regiment, and 4 enlisted men. Wounded, Captain Baylis, Seventh Mississippi Battalion; Lieutenant Randolph,Third Louisiana, and 20 enlisted men. Total in division--killed, 8; wounded, 32.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
May 25, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report briefly the operations of yesterday along my line.
        At dawn the enemy commenced his usual sharpshooting, and a little later opened from his batteries also; the fire from both, however, was much reduced. On the left, the enemy was busy throwing up intrenchments, and in front of the works, on the Jackson road, they pushed a sap to within 20 feet of the works. A few hand.grenades made them desist.
        The Second Texas Regiment, of Moore's brigade, had, up to the morning of the 24th, collected from its front eighty-three stand of arms, and the Forty-second Alabama five. Most of them were Enfield rifles. They also obtained about 9,000 rounds of cartridges and 1,500 caps.
        Casualties--In Moore's brigade--wounded, 8 enlisted men. In Hébert's brigade--killed, 2 enlisted men; wounded, I officer and 1 enlisted man.

I am, major, very respectfully,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
May 27, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report that on yesterday the enemy con-tinned his usual sharpshooting and artillery firing. Casualties in the division, 1 killed and 7 wounded. The enemy is making gradual approaches upon our works by digging trenches and throwing up breastworks and traverses. In this they are strongly supported by columns of infantry, and I do not see that it is practicable for us to attempt to stop them. We need at least one more regiment to be placed in the trenches along the Jackson road and between the two works on that road. There is a space along there now unoccupied by troops, the two regiments intended as a reserve for that point having been removed. This is, in my opinion, a matter of moment, and I wish the attention of the commanding general particularly called to it.
        We have now no reserves for General Hébert's position, and, indeed, none for General Moore's, the Seventeenth Louisiana, although held in reserve, being in point of fact guarding two points now unoccupied by troops.
        General Moore reports his men much worn in the trenches, and recommends that a portion of them be withdrawn during the day to a short distance from the trenches for rest. I would concur in this recommendation were it not that the enemy is so close at hand.

I am, major, very respectfully,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
Near Vicksburg, May 28, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report yesterday's proceedings along my line.
        Before the works on Jackson road the enemy continues to work on his breastworks and trenches. We think, however, he has discontinued the work on the sap or mine within 20 feet of the work on Jackson road.
        I inclose report of General Moore in relation to the works of the enemy on his right.
        Three regiments from General Bowen's division arrived yesterday evening, and are posted as follows, viz: One in the trenches along the Jackson road, and between the main works on either side of that road. The other two in reserve in Magazine ravine, between Jackson and Baldwin's Ferry roads.
        The sharpshooting and artillery firing of the enemy slightly slackened.
        Casualties.--Killed, 2 enlisted men; wounded, 8 enlisted men, all of Hébert's brigade.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major General.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
May 29, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report the following casualties in my command on yesterday: Hébert's brigade, 2 killed; Moore's brigade, 10 wounded. Five of the latter casualties were caused by a shot passing through the parapet and exploding an ammunition chest.
        I have just written a note to the engineer, giving him the following information, viz: That Colonel [S. D.] Russell, commanding Third Louisiana, reports that one of the enemy's works in his front (Jackson road) is assuming the shape of a formidable redoubt, and another is being loop-holed for sharpshooters; also that General Moore reports his parapet too slight to resist the enemy's shot, and makes the suggestion that cotton bales be placed against the parapet on the inside, and covered with about a foot of earth. I have asked the engineer to see to these two positions as soon as possible.
        The object of the heavy firing of the enemy on General Moore's position early this morning (29th) is not known, as the shot passed entirely above the works.

I am, major, very respectfully,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
June 27, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of the report of Brigadier-General Hébert, of the operations on his line on the afternoon and night of the 25th instant.
        The enemy has now retired from the parapet, which he had blown up, and our forces reoccupy it this morning, the sandbags which the enemy had placed there serving as protection to our men. The enemy is digging again outside, probably mining again.
        The report of Brigadier-General Moore for the same time shows nothing of particular interest. The enemy opened upon him from their trenches a very brisk and rapid, but ill-directed, fire of small-arms, with some artillery, which did but little damage. This was continued for about two hours and a half, commencing at 5 p.m. 25th instant.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
July 2, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: For the information of the lieutenant-general commanding, I make the following synopsis of the operations along my line during yesterday and the day before:
        In General Moore's line, on the night of the 30th ultimo, Lieutenant [William] Allen, of the Second Texas Regiment, succeeded in burning the remaining sap.roller on the Baldwin's Ferry road. He used turpentine fire-balls. At first the enemy pulled away the balls as fast as they were thrown against the roller; but the officer threw over a loaded shell wrapped in cotton, saturated with turpentine, which exploded the moment the enemy seized it. After this the roller was soon burned. The other sap roller had been previously burned by Lieutenant Burt, of Withers' artillery, who shot a piece of fuse into it from a musket. Since the burning of the sap-rollers the enemy seems to have given up extending his lines left of the Baldwin's Ferry road, and have begun what appears to be a mound, at which he is working industriously.
        Yesterday they opened again from their trenches a brisk musketry fire, object not known. On General Hébert's line, at 1.30 p.m. yesterday, as the lieutenant-general is already informed, the enemy exploded a mine, perhaps two simultaneously, under the redan on the left of the Jackson road. The work was at the time defended by the Sixth Missouri Regiment. The enemy made no attempt to charge after the explosion. Perhaps he only wished to destroy life and weaken the position. In this he has succeeded but too well. The redan itself is entirely gone, and the interior the considerably weakened.
        Immediately after the explosion, the enemy opened his batteries upon the point mined, doing considerable damage. He also opened from what is supposed to be a Cohorn mortar, which throws its missiles among the men with great accuracy, killing and wounding many, and tending much to dishearten the men. At the time of the explosion, 1 white man (sapper) and 8 negroes are reported to have been countermining in the redan, who were, of course, lost. Besides these, 1 man was killed and 20 wounded by the explosion in the Third Louisiana, which was on the left of the Sixth Missouri. Also 4 men of [William T] Ratliff's battery wounded. The casualties in the Missouri regiment must have been numerous. They were not reported to me.
        The sap-roller in front of the Thirty-eighth Mississippi Regiment, on the Jackson road, was burned last night by Capt. L. B. Taylor, of General Hébert's staff, by means of fire-balls, in the same manner as the one on Baldwin's Ferry road.
        Yesterday bodies of infantry and artillery were observed from the Jackson road, moving to our right. There was nothing to indicate their destination.

I am, major, very respectfully,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General. 


DIVISION HEADQUARTERS,
Enterprise, Miss., July 21, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: In compliance with instructions from the lieutenant-general commanding, of this date, calling for report of battles of Baker's Creek and Big Black River, and also of the operations during the siege of Vicksburg, I have to report that, on or about May 4, I relieved Major-General Stevenson, in command of the Second Military District, headquarters at Vicksburg.
        During the battle of Baker's Creek, on May 16, my command consisted of the following troops, viz, my own division proper (Hébert's and Moore's brigades), Major-General [M. L.] Smith's division State troops, under General Harris, Colonel [T. N.] Waul's Texas Legion, and the heavy artillery, Colonel Higgins commanding, posted as follows: General Hébert, with his brigade, occupied the line along the Yazoo River, from Haynes' Bluff to Mississippi River, General Moore, with his brigade and the State troops attached, guarding river front at, Warrenton and the approaches from the lower ferries on Big Black River. One brigade of General Smith's division was posted in the city, guarding the river front. With the other two brigades of his division, with Waul's Legion attached, General Smith guarded the approaches to the city from the Hall's Ferry road around to the railroad bridge on the Big Black River; the heavy artillery at the batteries in town. Beside these troops thus posted in the vicinity of Vicksburg, there was also under my orders Colonel [S. W.] Ferguson, on the Upper Deer Creek and Sunflower River, with a few companies of infantry, a section of artillery, and a small force of cavalry. None of these troops were engaged in the battle of Baker's Creek. A portion of General Smith's command was engaged in the battle of Big Black Bridge. The part taken by them in that engagement will doubtless be reported through General Smith.

SIEGE OF VICKSBURG.

        On the morning of May 17, while the main body of the army was falling back to the intrenchments around Vicksburg, I reassumed command of my division proper, and, in pursuance of instructions from the lieutenant-general commanding, directed General Hébert to prepare to evacuate the post of Snyder's Mill, and to hurry into Vicksburg all commissary stores possible. For this purpose all available wagons were sent to him. In the afternoon of the same day, I was directed to place my division in the trenches. Accordingly, General Moore's brigade was brought at once from its position near Warrenton, and placed in the intrenchments on either side of the Baldwin's Ferry road. General Hébert was directed to march his troops to Vicksburg, bringing with him all ordnance and ordnance stores he could; to send up the Yazoo all boats at Haynes' Bluff, with orders that they should be fired rather than allowed to fall into the hands of the enemy; to send mounted men to watch the approaches from Bridgeport and the railroad bridge, and to leave behind, at Snyder's, a few companies to keep up a show of occupation, with orders to destroy the heavy guns and other public property (previously prepared for destruction) whenever it would become evident the place would fall into the possession of the enemy, and then to make the best of their way to Vicksburg, or endeavor to escape across the Yazoo. A report of the proceedings of this detachment has, I presume, been made to the lieutenant-general commanding, by Col. I. W. Patton, who was by him sent back to attend to the matter.
        The detachment rejoined its command in Vicksburg on the morning of the 18th. General Hébert arrived in Vicksburg, with his command, before daylight on the morning of the 18th, having succeeded in bringing with him, from Snyder's, besides all the light pieces, two 20-pounder Parrotts and a Whitworth gun. His troops were soon in the intrenchments on either side of the Jack, on road. In bringing my troops from their former position, I directed them to drive inside of the fortifications all the beef-cattle, hogs, and sheep that had been collected from the surrounding country, and squads of mounted men had previously been sent out for this purpose.
        On May 18, at about 1 p.m., Brigadier-General Shoup, of General Smith's division, reported the enemy advancing on his position, and, by direction of the lieutenant-general, two of General Hébert's regiments were sent from his right to re-enforce his left. The whole of the division (the effective strength of which was about 4,700) was now in the trenches, from the railroad, on the right, to Graveyard road, on the left, a distance of about 2 miles (Moore on the right, Hébert on the left). On this line there were twenty-seven pieces of artillery, most of which were field pieces. This number was afterward increased by three or four siege guns placed in rear of my right. Besides my own troops, Colonel Waul's Texas Legion was also assigned to me and held in reserve behind Moore's brigade. Brigadier-General Lee's brigade, of Major-General Stevenson's division, was on my immediate right; Brigadier-General Shoup's brigade, of Major-General Smith's division, on my immediate left. On the 19th, the enemy made his first assault on my extreme left and extending along Smith's division. He was several times repulsed, and finally fell back. By this time my entire division front was completely and closely invested. My skirmishers were withdrawn, and skirmishing prohibited (by order), in order to husband ammunition. During the next day the enemy kept up his sharpshooting and artillery fire, but made no assault.
        On May 22, he assaulted three points on my line as follows: Three times on my extreme left and extending to General Smith's front, twice on the Jackson road, and twice on Baldwin's Ferry road, at 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. These assaults were made by larger bodies and apparently with greater determination than those of May 19. Colonel Waul's Legion had previously been sent to General Stevenson; but Green's brigade, of Bowen's division, was in reserve behind my right, and assisted in repelling the attack at that point. There were also on this day two Louisiana regiments, of Smith's division, in reserve behind my division. The enemy was repulsed in each of his attempts, though he succeeded in getting a few men into our exterior ditches at each point of attack, from which they were, however, driven before night. Hand-grenades were used at each point with good effect. A color-bearer and two stand of colors were captured by the Second Texas Regiment, of Moore's brigade.
        On this day the casualties in my division were 42 killed and 95 wounded. The loss of the enemy must have reached 2,000.
        From this time to the close of the siege the enemy kept up an incessant fire of sharpshooting and cannonading, in the mean time planting batteries and continuing his approaches, the main points being the work on the Baldwin's Ferry road, the one on the Jackson road, and a point midway between the Graveyard and Jackson roads. Approaches were also made on my extreme left; but this point was properly speaking, under the supervision of Major-General Smith.
        On or about June 2, my line was contracted by closing in to the right, in consequence of its close investment and the reduction of its numbers by casualties, my left now resting midway between the Graveyard and Jackson roads. The approaches at all the above-mentioned points were brought to within easy hand-grenade distance, and mines were pushed forward under the works. The enemy made strenuous efforts to possess himself of the main work on the Jackson road, defended by the Third Louisiana Regiment, the occupation of which by him would necessitate the abandonment of our trenches for a considerable distance to the right and left, as it would give him an enfilade fire either way. Opposite this point he planted a number of heavy siege guns, with which he made a serious breach in the parapet of the redan. The fire of these guns was, however, in a great measure diverted by the fire of a 10-inch mortar, which we had planted close in the rear of our lines. We were only permitted to retain this mortar a few days, when it was again removed to the right and its place supplied by a 9-inch Dahlgren gun, which the enemy disabled the second day after it opened fire.
        On June 25, at about 5 p.m., the enemy sprung his first mine under the parapet of this work. The explosion effected a breach through which the enemy immediately attempted to charge, but was promptly and gallantly repulsed. The Sixth Missouri Regiment, which had been held in reserve, was on the spot immediately after the explosion, and its commander, Col. Eugene Erwin, was instantly killed while attempting to lead a charge over the works. Six men of the Forty-third Mississippi Regiment, who were in a shaft countermining at the time of the explosion, were buried and lost. At dark the enemy had possessed himself of the ditch and slope of the parapet, and our forces retired to an interior line a few feet back. This point was now re-enforced by a part of Colonel [F. M.] Cockrell's brigade, of Bowen's division, and work was resumed by the enemy and by us, they mining and we countermining, until July 1, at about 1 p.m., when the enemy sprung his second mine, which was much heavier than the first. The result was the entire demolition of the redan, leaving only an immense chasm where it stood. The greater portion of the earth was thrown toward the enemy, the line of least resistance being in that direction. Our interior line was much injured. Nine men who were countermining were necessarily lost, and a large number of those manning the works were killed- and wounded. The enemy, however, made no attempt to charge, seeming satisfied with having materially weakened the position. I understand that the amount of powder used by the enemy in this explosion was one ton.
        While all this was taking place on the Jackson road, the enemy was by no means idle at other points. At the work on the Baldwin's Ferry road his sappers had nearly reached the ditch. At this place we sprung a counter-mine, which was unfortunately a little premature.
        The artillery, though well served, was of but little advantage to us during the siege. The enemy concentrated a heavy fire, dismounting or disabling gun after gun. To this fire we could make but a feeble response. Ammunition was scarce, and orders forbade its use except against advancing columns of infantry or batteries being planted. The proportionate loss of officers and men of the artillery was unusually great.
        On July 1, I received a confidential note from the lieutenant-general commanding, informing me that unless the siege of Vicksburg was raised or supplies thrown in, it would be necessary very shortly to evacuate the place; that he saw no prospect of the former, and that very great, if not insuperable, obstacles were in the way of the latter, and calling for a report as to the condition of my troops, and their ability to make the marches and undergo the fatigues necessary to accomplish a successful evacuation. I laid the matter clearly before my brigade commanders, and they in turn before their regimental and battalion commanders. It was their unanimous opinion, in which I concurred, that although the spirit of the men was good, their physical condition and health was so much impaired by their long confinement in narrow trenches, without exercise and without relief, being constantly under fire and necessarily on the alert, and living upon greatly reduced rations, that they could not make the marches they would have to make and fight the battles they would have to fight against the greatly superior numbers that would be brought against them in making the attempt to break through the enemy's lines. I therefore favored a capitulation rather than make this attempt, attended, as I thought, with such little hope of success.
        Finally, on July 4, at 10 a.m., in accordance with the terms of the capitulation, my troops were marched by regiments over the intrenchments, their arms stacked and left in possession of the enemy, while they returned to bivouac in rear of the trenches.
        The siege of Vicksburg was a contest which tried more the endurance and resolution of the men and their company and regimental commanders than the skill of their generals.
        My men during the siege did their duty and their whole duty to the entire satisfaction of their general, and I trust of their country. The patience with which my troops submitted to the many privations and hardships to which they were subjected, and the unabated courage and cheerfulness which they sustained throughout, are worthy of all praise, and merited a better fortune.
        The casualties in my division during the siege were as follows: Hébert's brigade--killed, 203; wounded, 480. Moore's brigade--killed, 72; wounded, 385. Total--killed, 275; wounded, 865.
        I inclose herewith the reports of the brigade commanders.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General.

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