Capture of the U. S. transport Fanny
Near Chicamacomico, or Loggerhead Inlet, North Carolina.
October 1, 1861

Report of Brig. Gen. Joseph K. F. Mansfield, U.S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,
Fort Monroe, October 5, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND,
A. A. G., Hdqrs. of the Army.

        SIR: I have the honor to report to the Lieutenant-General commanding that yesterday afternoon the steamer Pawnee arrived from Hatteras Inlet, and brought the captain and crew of the steamer Fanny, a steamer that had been chartered as a tender and defense at the inlet. (I should have made this report by yesterday's mail if I had not been at the time of the above arrival at Newport News and did not return till after dark.) It appears that the steamer Fanny left Fort Hatteras about 6 a.. m. on the 1st instant, with ammunition' and supplies for the Twentieth Indiana Regiment, stationed some 40 miles on the beach northward, at a locality called Chicamacomico, or Loggerhead Inlet. She had on board Capt. I. W. Hart, Sergeant-Major Peacock, and about 23 men of the Twentieth Indiana and Ninth New York Regiments, with a Sawyer gun and a large supply of ammunition and stores for the troops. When within 5 miles of her destination she met the U.S. naval steamer Putnam, which turned round and convoyed her to anchorage in 6 feet of water off the landing some 3 miles. The Putnam put on board the Fanny a rifled cannon and ammunition therefor, and then started for Fort Hatteras. At the same time stated she had seen a rebel steamer westward, and gave as reason for returning that she was short of coal. In about an hour and a half after, say at 2.30, a large fiat from the shore came alongside the Fanny and received a load of supplies, such as tents, bread, &c. In about two hours after, three steamers approached from the westward, and at a long range commenced an attack. Not a shot struck the Fanny, and some eight or nine shots were fired at the enemy, one of which took effect. Then the cable was slipped and the Fanny was run ashore some 2 3/4 miles still from the beach, and the crew abandoned her in a boat, and the officer in charge, Captain Hart, hoisted a white flag, and surrendered before a gun was fired on either side. The captain of the Fanny, John M. Morrison, left in a small boat with his sick son. The mate, George K. Ridgely, and engineer and others of the crew remained until the white flag was hoisted. Some ammunition was thrown overboard, but the guns were not thrown overboard nor the boat sunk, as was recommended by the mate and engineer. The steamer Fanny was an excellent boat for the station, and her boiler and engine in excellent order. The above facts I obtained from a personal examination of the captain, mate, engineer, and a deck hand separately.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOS. K. F. MANSFIELD,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.


Report of Brig. Gen. Benjamin Huger, C. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE FORCES,
Norfolk, October 5, 1861.

General S. COOPER,
Adjutant and inspector General.

        SIR: As I informed you by telegraph, Col. A. R. Wright, commanding Third Georgia Regiment, writes from Roanoke Island, dated 2d instant, stating "We received information yesterday morning that the Yankees were about landing men near Chicamacomico, and immediately left this post, taking 150 men on board the steamers Curlew, Raleigh, and Junaluski, Commodore Lynch being in command of these vessels. At 5 p.m. we came in sight of a steamer (Federal), which proved to be the Fanny, having on board a quantity of quartermaster's and commissary stores for the Twentieth Indiana Regiment, in command of Captain Hart. After an engagement of thirty-five minutes the Fanny surrendered, and we made prisoners of the entire force--47 men, 2 officers, and i negro. The Fanny mounted two rifled cannon, and made a gallant resistance, but the superior weight of our guns gave us the advantage. The gun of the Curlew was manned by a crew from Captain McWhorter's company of this regiment, and worked their gun beautifully. All behaved well. We had to return for want of fuel, and I am now engaged with all my men cutting wood, and as soon as 1 can get a supply we will return and endeavor to capture the Federals who are encamped at Chicamacomico. We cannot send the prisoners up to-day for want of fuel. Indeed, we are almost helpless here on this account." Nobody hurt. I will do all in my power to assist the forces at Roanoke to push on.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. HUGER,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

I beg instructions concerning the prisoners, who will soon reach here.


Report of Col. A. R. Wright, Third Georgia Infantry.

HEADQUARTERS FORCES,
Roanoke Island, October 2, 1861.

Brig. Gen. BEN. HUGER.

        GENERAL: I have Just returned from an expedition against the Yankees. We received information yesterday morning that the Yankees were about landing men near Chicamacomico, and immediately left this post, taking 150 men on board the steamers Curlew, Raleigh, and Junaluski, Commodore Lynch being in command of these vessels. At 5 o'clock p.m. we came in sight of a steamer (Federal), which proved to be the Fanny, having on board a quantity of quartermaster and commissary stores for the Twentieth Indiana Regiment, in command of Captain Hart. After an engagement of thirty-five minutes the Fanny surrendered, and we made prisoners of the entire force--47 men, 2 officers, and 1 negro. The Fanny mounted two rifled cannon and made a gallant resistance, but the superior weight of our guns gave us the advantage. The gun of the Curlew was manned by a crew from Captain McWhorter's company of this regiment, and worked their gun beautifully. All behaved well. We had to return for want of fuel, and I am now engaged with all my men cutting wood, and as soon as I can get a supply we will return and endeavor to capture the Federals who are encamped at Chicamacomico. We cannot send the prisoners up to-day for want of fuel. Indeed, we are almost helpless here on this account. We will demolish the light at Hatteras if we do no more. The captured Federals report a large force at Hatteras, but I think we can manage them.
        Among the captured stores are a number of coats (over), which my men need very much. May I not distribute them among my men? I am taking an inventory of the stores, and will send it on to you when completed.
        Look out for something stirring in a few days. Commodore Lynch and myself get along finely, each cheerfully co-operating with the other.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,
A. R. WRIGHT.

        No one injured on either side. We captured a large quantity of fixed ammunition, powder, shells, &c. Colonel Butler, who will hand you this, can give you some particulars.

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