Reports of Brig. Gen. Alfred T. A. Torbert,
U. S. Army, commanding First Brigade.
O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign

 

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., FIRST DIV., SIXTH ARMY CORPS,
August 3, 1863.

Capt. HENRY R. DALTON,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Division Headquarters.

        SIR: I have the honor to report the following as the part taken by this brigade (First, Second, Third, and Fifteenth New Jersey Volunteers) at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa.:
        On the night of July 1, about 10 o clock, the brigade started from near Manchester, Md., for Gettysburg. The distance by the route we marched was about 35 miles, and we made it by 4 p.m. on the 2d, only stopping an hour, about 1 p.m. on the 2d, to make coffee. We rested near the battle-field about two hours, when we were ordered to the left of the line, where we arrived about dark, with only 25 men absent, and they came up by the morning. The brigade was held in this position in reserve till morning.
        Early on the morning of the 3d, the brigade was detached from the corps, and put in position in front and about the center of the line. This position we held till the morning of the 5th.
        In the meantime the brigade was not actively engaged, excepting on the picket line, where there were 11 enlisted men wounded, and during this time the brigade was under the orders of Major-General Newton, commanding First Corps.
        Much credit is due to Lieutenant-Colonel Wiebecke, Second Regiment New Jersey Volunteers, in charge of the picket line, and also Lieutenant [Howard H.] Goldsmith, additional aide-de-camp (his assistant), for their good management of the same on July 3.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
A. T. A. TORBERT,
Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

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HDQRS. FIRST BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS,
July 17, 1863.

        Pursuant to circular from headquarters Army of the Potomac, inspector-general's office, of July 16, 1863, I have the honor to report as follows:

Strength of command
Command  Officers  Enlisted men  Total
1st New Jersey  28  328  356
2d New Jersey  30  41  448
3d New Jersey  27  340  367
15th New Jersey  21  471  492
Total  106  1,557  1,663

 

Killed, Wounded, and Missing since the battle of Gettysburg
Command  Killed  Wounded  Date  Remarks
1st New Jersey  --- 1 July 13, 1863  Skirmish near Funkstown, Md
2d New Jersey  --- 6 6 July 3, 1863  Gettysburg, Pa
  --- 2 July 11, 1863  Skirmish near Hagerstown, Md
3d New Jersey 1 1 July 5, 1863  Skirmish near Fairfield, Pa
  --- 1 July 3, 1863  Gettysburg, Pa
  --- 1 July 12, 1863  Near Funkstown, Md
15th New Jersey --- 3 July 3, 1863  Gettysburg, Pa Since dead
  --- 2 July 12, 1863 Funkstown, Md
Total  1  17    

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HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., FIRST DIV., SIXTH ARMY CORPS,
August 13, 1863.

Capt. HENRY R. DALTON.
Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division.

        SIR: Agreeably to circular from headquarters Army of the Potomac, of August 13, I have the honor to report the following as the operations of this brigade--First, Second, Third, and Fifteenth Regiments New Jersey Volunteers--from June 28 to July 25:
        June
28.--Marched from a point about half way between Edwards Ferry, on the Potomac, and Poolesville, Md., to Hyattstown; distance, about 18 miles.
        June
29.--Marched from Hyattstown, Md., via New Market and Ridgeville, to near New Windsor, Md.; distance, about 22 miles.
        June
30.--Marched from near New Windsor, via Westminster, to Manchester: distance, about 23 miles.
        July
1.--Made a forced march from Manchester to Gettysburg, Pa.; distance, about 35 miles. Started at 10 p.m.; marched all night and the next day (July 2) until 4 p.m., only stopping about one hour at 1 p.m. to make coffee. Arrived on the battle-field with only 25 men absent. Rested near the center of the line for about two hours, when we were ordered to the left of the line, where we arrived about dark. The brigade was drawn up in two lines in reserve, in which position it was held until morning, the men sleeping on their arms.
        July
3.--The absentees had joined their companies. Early in the morning the brigade was detached from the corps, and put in position in front and about the center of the line, and picketing strongly our own front, connecting on the right with the First Corps and on the left with the Fifth Corps. The brigade was not actively engaged on this day, excepting on the picket line, where there were 11 men wounded. A few men in the brigade were wounded by the explosion of shells.
        July
4.--Held the same position as on the 3d. Much credit is due to Lieutenant-Colonel Wiebecke, Second Regiment, who was in charge of the picket line on the 3d, and also Lieutenant Goldsmith, additional aide-de-camp, who assisted him, for their very efficient management of the same. While the brigade was detached from the corps, I was under the orders of Maj. Gen. John Newton, commanding First Army Corps.
        July
5.--Broke camp at 3 a.m.; joined my division and corps, taking the lead of the same. Started about 11 a.m. to follow the rear of the rebel army; marching in line of battle about 6 miles, covered by a heavy line of skirmishers, came up with their rear guard about 2 miles from Fairfield, and had a sharp skirmish. About 5 p.m. drove the enemy to Fairfield, and at night fell back about 1 miles. Loss of the enemy, 2 killed, 2 officers and 4 privates prisoners. Our loss, 1 killed and 2 wounded.
        July
6.--Started at 6 p.m. for Emmitsburg, as rear guard of the corps and trains; marched all night; arrived about daylight; distance, about 8 miles.
        July
7.--Started at 6 a.m.; marched all day and until 10 p.m., stopping in the mountains near Hamburg in a severe rain storm; distance, about 15 miles.
        July
8.--Marched at daylight over the mountain to Middletown; distance, about 8 miles.
        July
9.--Started at 4 p.m.; marched to Boonsborough; distance, about 8 miles.
        July
10.--Marched about 3 miles, and took position in two lines.
        July
11.--Remained in same position.
        July
12.--Marched about 6 miles; took position, first, about 2 miles from Hagerstown, on the Boonsborough and Hagerstown pike; about 2 p.m. changed position more to the left; 5 p.m. advanced picket line; drove in the enemy's pickets; lost 3 officers and 4 men wounded.
        July
13.--Remained in same position.
        July
14.--Advanced and marched to Williamsport, about 6 miles.
        July
15.--Marched from Williamsport to Boonsborough; 16 miles.
        July
16.--Marched from Boonsborough via Middletown and Petersville to Berlin; distance, about 20 miles.
        July
17.--Remained in camp all day.
        July
18.--Removed camp about 2 miles.
        July
19.--Crossed the Potomac at Berlin on pontoon bridge; encamped near Wheatland, Va.; distance, 8 miles.
        July
20.--Broke camp at 10 a.m., and marched via Purcellville to Aldie and Snickersville pike, and encamped near Philomont; distance, 14 miles.
        July
21.--Remained in camp all day.
        July
22.--Broke camp at 10 p.m., and marched via Union to the Little River turnpike; distance, 12 miles.
        July
23.--Broke camp at 4 a.m.; marched via Rectortown to White Plains; distance, 12 miles.
        July
24.--Broke camp at 6 p.m.; marched toward Warrenton; stopped about 12 o'clock at night near New Baltimore.
        July
25.--Broke camp at 6 a.m., and marched to Warrenton via New Baltimore, distance 6 miles, and took position on the Sulphur Springs road.
        Too much praise cannot be given to officers and men for their patience and endurance on this long and tedious march of about 250 miles. There was far less straggling than was ever known in this brigade before.

I am, very respectfully, yours, &c..
A. T. A. TORBERT,
Brigadier-General of Volunteers

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