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Statistics Of The U.S.S. Monitor

Acquisition:--Built by contract with John Ericsson at Green Point, L. I. Launched January 30, 1862.

Cost:--$275,000 or $280,000.

Description.--
Class: Monitor; screw steamer; iron and wood; single turret.
Rate, rig, etc.: Original type of turreted vessel.
Tonnage.--776 (987).
Dimensions.--Length, 172'; beam, 41' 6"; depth, 11' 4".
Draft.--Just after being launched; forward, 7' 8"; aft, 8' 1" (10' 6").
Engines.--Double trunk, cylinders (2 in 1 casting); 36" diameter, 27" stroke.
Boilers.--Two; return tube "box" boilers.
Battery.--2 XI-inch guns in turret.

Disposition.--Foundered off Hatteras, December 31, 1862, Commander J.P. Bankhead in command.

Remarks.--Cost of articles furnished to her was $560.35. Had famous engagement with C. S. S. Merrimack in Hampton Roads, March 9, 1862. First engagement of ironclads.

Crew Size:

Report of Lieutenant Worden, U. S. Navy, regarding the complement of officers and crew for the U. S. S. Monitor.

NAVY YARD, NEW YORK, January 27, 1862.

Hon. GIDEON WELLES,
Secretary of the Navy.

        SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 24th instant, in relation to the complement of officers and crew for Ericsson's ironclad battery.
        In estimating the number of her crew, I allowed 15 men and a quarter gunner for the two guns, 11 men for the powder division, and 1 for the wheel, which I deem ample for the efficient working of her guns in action. That would leave 12 men (including those available in the engineer's department) to supply deficiencies at the guns, caused by sickness or casualties. I propose to use a portion of the petty officers at the guns, and in naming the number of that class I thought I would be enabled to obtain a better class of men for that purpose.
        It is believed that 17 men and 2 officers in the turret would be as many as could work there with advantage; a greater number would be in each other's way and cause embarrassment.
        The limited accommodations of the battery and the insufficiency of ventilation renders it important that as few as is consistent with her efficiency in action should be put in her.
In relation to masters mates, one might be ordered; more would overcrowd her accommodations and seems to be unnecessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOHN L. WORDEN,
Lieutenant, Commanding.

Source: Naval Official Records

This Page last updated 11/16/04

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