The Gettysburg Address,
What It Means To Me

by

Mohawk

On November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. He delivered this important speech four months after the Battle of Gettysburg. The battle resulted in the death of over 51,000 Union and Confederate soldiers and was one of the bloodiest battles of the entire Civil War.

President Lincoln talked about how our fore-fathers brought forth this new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. I believe that he was trying to say that no man is better than another because of his wealth, wisdom, family, heritage, or of the color of his skin.

To me, the Gettysburg Address means many things. It means that men fought and died so that I may live in a free nation, not one that holds slavery. It also means that I have the right to choose the way that I want to lead my own live and allows me to make my own choices. But the main thing it means to me, is that our nation is not split in half over issues that took place over 100 years ago. It means that our nation can endure great hardships, and work our way back to where we started from.

We all, as citizens of this country, must continue to work hard to keep what President Lincoln expressed in his address true. Today, we are not fighting a war, but we need to remember the battles fought in the Civil War and the people that fought to give us what we have today.

Those are just a few of the many things that the Gettysburg Address means to me. So, when I think about the Gettysburg Address, I will think of President Lincoln, and the many thousands of men that gave the ultimate sacrifice to keep intact what President Lincoln said on that cold day, back in 1863.

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