Meade's Congratulatory Order For The Battle Of Gettysburg

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/3 [S# 45]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, And Department Of The East, From June 3 To August 3, 1863.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#21

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 68.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 4, 1863--4.15 p.m.

        The commanding general, in behalf of the country, thanks the Army of the Potomac for the glorious result of the recent operations.
        An enemy, superior in numbers, and flushed with the pride of a successful invasion, attempted to overcome and destroy this army. Utterly baffled and defeated, he has now withdrawn from the contest. The privations and fatigue the army has endured, and the heroic courage and gallantry it has displayed, will be matters of history, to be ever remembered.
        Our task is not yet accomplished, and the commanding general looks to the army for greater efforts to drive from our soil every vestige of the presence of the invader.
        It is right and proper that we should, on all suitable occasions, return our grateful thanks to the Almighty Disposer of events, that in the goodness of his providence He has thought fit to give victory to the cause of the just.

By command of Major-General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,


Lincoln's Response to Meade's General Orders, No. 68

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/3 [S# 45]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, And Department Of The East, From June 3 To August 3, 1863.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#23

SOLDIERS' HOME,
[Washington,] July
6, 1863--7 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

        I left the telegraph office a good deal dissatisfied. You know I did not like the phrase, in Orders, No. 68, I believe, "Drive the invaders from our soil." Since that, I see a dispatch from General French, saying the enemy is crossing his wounded over the river in flats, without saying why he does not stop it, or even intimating a thought that it ought to be stopped. Still later, another dispatch from General Pleasonton, by direction of General Meade, to General French, stating that the main army is halted because it is believed the rebels are concentrating "on the road toward Hagerstown, beyond Fairfield," and is not to move until it is ascertained that the rebels intend to evacuate Cumberland Valley.
        These things all appear to me to be connected with a purpose to cover Baltimore and Washington, and to get the enemy across the river again without a further collision, and they do not appear connected with a purpose to prevent his crossing and to destroy him. I do fear the former purpose is acted upon and the latter is rejected.
        If you are satisfied the latter purpose is entertained and is judiciously pursued, I am content. If you are not so satisfied, please look to it.

Yours truly,
A. LINCOLN.

Source:  " The Official Records of the War Rebellion for the Union and Confederate Armies"

This page last updated 11/29/05

RETURN TO GETTYSBURG PAGE