General Hooker is Relieved!

        A series of Official Reports that details the events leading up to Joseph Hooker being relieved as commander of the Army of the Potomac just prior to the battle of Gettysburg.

Reports of Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, U.S. Army,
Commanding Army Of The Potomac,
Of Operations June 3-27, And Correspondence
With The Authorities In Washington, etc.
O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 4, 1863. (Received 9.50 a.m.)

Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War:

       It has this moment been reported to me that several of the enemy's camps were removed during last night. Shall be able to determine the direction shortly if this should be found to be the case.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 4, 1863. (Received 12 m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, &C.,
Washington:

       Following received from General Buford, June 4:

Nothing noteworthy to report. Yesterday Colonel Duffié's pickets reported enemy crossing in considerable force at Sulphur Springs. Preparations made to welcome them, but they did not come. Country and river, as high up as Orleans, New Baltimore, and Thoroughfare Gap, visited yesterday and last night. Nothing was seen or heard.

JNO. BUFORD.

       The movements of the enemy in our front do not indicate what their purpose or object may be. Has General Dix's force moved to White House or beyond there? His position, strength, and movements may govern or influence the enemy somewhat. I should like to be fully advised.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 4, 1863. (Received 6.20 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       Following from one of our scouts:

       I heard from at least three different parties, who I know had the means of obtaining the correct information, that General Jones had come from the Shenandoah Valley; that his headquarters were either in Rappahannock or Culpeper, and not very far distant from Culpeper Court-House, and that this information was obtained from some of his cavalry whose homes were in Fauquier, and who had been over to see their friends.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,
Major-General.


JUNE 5, 1863---11.30 a.m.

His Excellency THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

       Yesterday morning appearances indicated that during the night the enemy had broken up a few of his camps and abandoned them. These changes were observed on the right of his line, in the vicinity of Hamilton's Crossing. So far as I was enabled to judge, from all my means of information, it was impossible for me to determine satisfactorily whether this movement had merely been a change of camps---the enemy had moved in the direction of Richmond or up the river--but, taken in connection with the fact that some deserters came in from the divisions of Hood and Pickett, I concluded that those divisions had been brought to the front from their late positions at Gordonsville and Taylorsville, and that this could be for no other purpose but to enable the enemy to move up the river, with a view to the execution of a movement similar to that of Lee's last year. He must either have it in mind to cross the Upper Potomac, or to throw his army between mine and Washington, in case I am correct in my conjecture. To accomplish either, he must have been greatly re-enforced, and if making this movement, the fair presumption is that he has been by the troops from Charleston. Of this I have no evidence further than that furnished me by Major-General Dix, that they had come to Richmond.
       This morning some more of their camps have disappeared. The picket line along the river is preserved, and as strong as ever.
       General Buford, with three divisions of cavalry and ten pieces of artillery, is on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and yesterday was along the river beyond Sulphur Springs, and reports no enemy. As I am liable to be called on to make a movement with the utmost promptitude, I desire that I may be informed as early as practicable of the views of the Government concerning this army. Under instructions from the major-general commanding the army, dated January 31, I am instructed to keep "in view always the importance of covering Washington and Harper's Ferry, either directly or by so operating as to be able to punish any force of the enemy sent against them." In the event the enemy should move, as I almost anticipate he will, the head of his column will probably be headed toward the Potomac, via Gordonsville or Culpeper, while the rear will rest on Fredericksburg.
       After giving the subject my best reflection, I am of opinion that it is my duty to pitch into his rear, although in so doing the head of his column may reach Warrenton before I can return. Will it be within the spirit of my instructions to do so?
       In view of these contemplated movements of the enemy, I cannot too forcibly impress upon the mind of His Excellency the President the necessity of having one commander for all of the troops whose operations can have an influence on those of Lee's army. Under the present system, all independent commanders are in ignorance of the movements of the others; at least such is my situation. I trust that I may not be considered in the way to this arrangement, as it is a position I do not desire, and only suggest it, as I feel the necessity for concert as well as vigorous action.
       It is necessary for me to say this much that my motives may not be misunderstood.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WAR DEPARTMENT,
Washington, June 5, 1863--3 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Falmouth, Va.:

       Prisoners and deserters brought in here state that Stuart is preparing a column of from 15,000 to 20,000 men, cavalry and artillery, for a raid. They say it will be ready in two or three days.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, June 5, 1863---4 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       Yours of to-day was received an hour ago. So much of professional military skill is requisite to answer it, that I have turned the task over to General Halleck. He promises to perform it with his utmost care. I have but one idea which I think worth suggesting to you, and that is, in case you find Lee coming to the north of the Rappahannock, I would by no means cross to the south of it. If he should leave a rear force at Fredericksburg, tempting you to fall upon it, it would fight in intrenchments and have you at disadvantage, and so, man for man, worst you at that point, while his main force would in some way be getting an advantage of you northward. In one word, I would not take any risk of being entangled upon the river, like an ox jumped half over a fence and liable to be torn by dogs front and rear, without a fair chance to gore one way or kick the other. If Lee would come to my side of the river, I would keep on the same side, and fight him or act on the defense, according as might be my estimate of his strength relatively to my own. But these are mere suggestions, which I desire to be controlled by the judgment of yourself and General Halleck.

A. LINCOLN.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 5, 1863--4.40 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Falmouth, Va.:

       The President has directed me to reply to your telegram to him of 10 a.m. to-day. My instructions of January 31, which were then shown to the President, left you entirely free to act as circumstances, in your judgment, might require, with the simple injunction to keep in view the safety of Washington and Harper's Ferry. In regard to the contingency which you suppose may arise of General Lee's leaving a part of his forces in Fredericksburg, while, with the head of his column, he moves by Gordonsville or Culpeper toward the Potomac, it seems to me that such an operation would give you great advantages upon his flank to cut him in two, and fight his divided forces. Would it not be more advantageous to fight his movable column first, instead of first attacking his intrenchments, with your own forces separated by the Rappahannock? Moreover, you are aware that the troops under General Heintzelman are much less than the number recommended by all the boards for the defenses of Washington.
       Neither this capital nor Harper's Ferry could long hold out against a large force. They must depend for their security very much upon the co-operation of your army. It would, therefore, seem perilous to permit Lee's main force to move upon the Potomac while your army is attacking an intrenched position on the other side of the Rappahannock. Of course your movements must depend in a great measure upon those made by Lee. There is another contingency not altogether improbable--that Lee will seek to hold you in check with his main force, while a strong force will be detached for a raid into Maryland and Pennsylvania. The main force of the enemy in North Carolina have probably come north, but I think all available troops in South Carolina and Georgia have been sent to re-enforce Johnston in Mississippi. Such is the information here. General Heintzelman and General Dix are instructed to telegraph directly to you all the movements which they may ascertain or make. Directions have also been given to forward military information which may be received from General Schenck's command. Any movements you may suggest of troops in these commands will be ordered, if deemed practicable. Lee will probably move light and rapidly. Your movable force should be prepared to do the same.
       The foregoing views are approved by the President.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 5, 1863. (Received 6.45 p.m.)

Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War:

       The following is a dispatch which has been received from Brigadier-General Buford, commanding at Warrenton Junction:

WARRENTON JUNCTION, June 5, 1863.

Col. A. J. ALEXANDER,
Assistant Adjutant-General :

       I have just received information, which I consider reliable, that all the available cavalry force of the Confederacy is in Culpeper County. Stuart, the two Lees, [B. H.] Robertson, [A. G.] Jenkins, and [W. E.] Jones are all there. Robertson came from North Carolina, Jenkins from Kanawha, and Jones from the Valley. Jones arrived at Culpeper after the others, on the 3d. Since the Chancellorsville fight, their cavalry has been very much increased from the infantry; 800 Texans, from Hood's command, have been recently mounted on horses from Richmond. Informant, a refugee from Madison County, says that Stuart has 20,000. Can't tell his intentions, but thinks he is going to make a raid.

JNO. BUFORD,
Brigadier-General.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 5, 1863---9.15 p.m. (Received 9.45.)

His Excellency THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

       Mr. PRESIDENT: I should very much like to have Captain [Tredwell] Moore ordered to this army. Since writing this morning, I concluded to make a demonstration on the enemy by throwing a couple of bridges across the river at Franklin's Crossing, and to learn, if possible, what the enemy are about. As soon as we got to work, they began to assemble in great numbers from all quarters, and the more remote are still arriving. I took about 50 prisoners, and they report that the changes remarked in their camps proceeded from the reorganization of their army, and the assignments of them to new camps. All of Longstreet s command are now with Lee, but no part of the Charleston forces. They have no infantry force higher up the Rappahannock than its junction with the Rapidan. Their cavalry is assembled around Culpeper, but the threat to make a crossing may cause them to return. I shall keep my bridges down a few days.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 6, 1863--3 p.m. (Received 3.30 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       As the accumulation of the heavy rebel force of cavalry about Culpeper may mean mischief, I am determined, if practicable, to break it up in its incipiency. I shall send all my cavalry against them, stiffened by about 3,000 infantry. It will require until the morning of the 9th for my forces to gain their positions, and at daylight on that day it is my intention to attack them in their camps. As many of my cavalry are still unserviceable from the effects of Stoneman's raid, I am too weak to cope with the numbers of the enemy if as large as represented. It would add much to my efficiency if some of Stahel's forces could advance, and hold the fords at Beverly and Sulphur Springs some time during the forenoon of the 9th. If this should be done, I desire that the officer in command should not be informed of the object of his march, but merely to hold these fords. It is next to impossible to confine information to its proper limits.
       I have 2,500 sabers on a reconnaissance to-day in the vicinity of Jefferson. Jones' brigade, which has been hovering about Milroy all winter, numbering 1,600, is among them; also an additional brigade from North Carolina.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 6, 1863---8 p.m. (Received 8.45 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       I request that I may be informed whether or not I am to receive assistance in my attack on the rebel forces at Culpeper from any portion of Major-General Heintzelman's forces, and, if so, what?

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 9, 1863--12 m. (Received 6 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       Brigadier-General Pleasonton reports that, after a severe encounter with the rebel cavalry over the Beverly Ford, he has not been able to make head against it. He reports that his movement was anticipated.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 9, 1863--1 p.m.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX,
Fort Monroe, Va.:

       We have reliable information that Pickett's division, which was lately at Taylorsville, near Hanover Junction, has come up this way and gone toward the Rapidan. Hood's division preceded it in the same direction. We have also reason to believe that the available troops have been withdrawn from Richmond this way, leaving it nearly if not wholly unoccupied.
       The country between Fredericksburg and Richmond and below the right flank of Lee's army, which extends only 5 miles below the city, is open and unoccupied, excepting by small bodies and a force which has just gone down on account of a false alarm made by us in that direction. The Thirtieth Virginia alone is left near Hanover Junction. It is a weak regiment.
       Our scouts penetrate to Hanover Junction, and we believe the above reliable from previously reported information confirming it, and the character of the scouts. The movements in your direction have been countermanded, probably by my demonstrations.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.

(Copy to Major-General Halleck. Received 6.40 p.m.)


JUNE 10, 1863---2.30 p.m. (Received 5.10 p.m.)

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

       Mr. PRESIDENT: General Pleasonton, by telegram forwarded to the major-general commanding the army this morning, reports that he had an affair with the rebel cavalry yesterday near Brandy Station, which resulted in crippling him so much that he will have to abandon his contemplated raid into Maryland, which was to have started this morning.
       I am not so certain that the raid will be abandoned from this cause. It may delay the departure a few days. I shall leave the cavalry, which is all that I have mounted, where they are, near Bealeton, with instructions to resist the passage of the river by the enemy's forces. If to effect this he should bring up a considerable force of infantry, that will so much weaken him in my front that I have good reason to believe that I can throw a sufficient force over the river to compel the enemy to abandon his present position. If it should be the intention to send a heavy column of infantry to accompany the cavalry on the proposed raid, he can leave nothing behind to interpose any serious obstacle to my rapid advance on Richmond. I am not satisfied of his intention in this respect, but from certain movements in their corps I cannot regard it as altogether improbable. If it should be found to be the case, will it not promote the true interest of the cause for me to march to Richmond at once? From there all the disposable part of this army can be thrown to any threatened point north of the Potomac at short notice, and, until they can reach their destination, a sufficiency of troops can be collected to check, if not to stop, his invasion. If left to operate from my own judgment, with my present information, I do not hesitate to say that I should adopt this course as being the most speedy and certain mode of giving the rebellion a mortal blow. I desire that you will give it your reflection. At present the enemy has one corps of infantry at Gordonsville, with the advance at Culpeper, with the manifest tendency of other corps to drift in that direction. I now have two bridges across the Rappahannock, ready to spring over the river below Fredericksburg, and it is this, I believe, that causes the enemy to hesitate in moving forward.
       Major-General Dix informs me that he intends moving two columns up James River to-morrow; but if organized to correspond in numbers to the troops as they have of late been posted, neither column will be successful. The one on the north side of the river will be too small, and on the south side, with his whole column, I question if Richmond can be taken at all, provided 2,000 or 3,000 men could be assembled to defend it. The columns should unite at City Point, or below, and move on the north bank of that river.
       From information, which I deem reliable, the only troops remaining in Richmond is the provost-guard, 1,500, and all the troops between here and there are brought well to the front.
       It would be of incalculable service to this army to be transferred to some more remote point from Washington and Alexandria. The stampedes in those towns, gotten up, no doubt, by people in the rebel interest, have their influence on my men, for many of them have no means of knowing whether they are with or without cause. They think there must be some fire where there is so much smoke.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 10, 1863--6.40 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       Your long dispatch of to-day is just received. If left to me, I would not go south of Rappahannock upon Lee's moving north of it. If you had Richmond invested to-day, you would not be able to take it in twenty days: meanwhile your communications, and with them your army, would be ruined. I think Lee's army, and not Richmond, is your sure objective point. If he comes toward the Upper Potomac, follow on his flank and on his inside track, shortening your lines while he lengthens his. Fight him, too, when opportunity offers. If he stays where he is, fret him and fret him.

A. LINCOLN.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 11, 1863--12.40 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       The President has just referred to me your telegram and his reply of yesterday, with directions to say to you whether or not I agree with him. I do so fully.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 11, 1863--9 p.m. (Received 10.30 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

       I have just been reliably informed that Pettigrew's and Darnell's [Davis'] brigades from North Carolina are in Heth's division, near Hamilton's Crossing. I have no information concerning the residue of the forces drawn from North Carolina.
       A. P. Hill's corps is on the right, opposite to Franklin's Crossing; Ewell's is in rear of Fredericksburg, and Longstreet's corps and the cavalry are at Culpeper.
       I have to-day dispatched the Third Corps to picket the river from Meade's right, at Kelly's Ford, to Beverly Ford, in order to relieve the cavalry in aid of Pleasonton, who is looking after the district of country from Beverly to Sulphur Springs. Pleasonton is weak in cavalry compared with the enemy.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 12, 1863-7 a.m. (Received 8.40 a.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

       It is reported to me from the balloon that several new rebel camps have made their appearance this morning. There can be no doubt but that the enemy has been greatly re-enforced.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 12, 1863-8.30 a.m. (Received 8.45 a.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       General Pleasonton, without additional cavalry, I fear will not be able to prevent the rebel cavalry from turning his right. I have not been able to ascertain his precise strength, but know that it is near 7,500, while that of the enemy is certainly not less than 10,000. He now pickets beyond Sulphur Springs. He will, however, do the best he can. If he should be turned, you will perceive that I shall be constrained to abandon the Aquia Creek line of operations.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 12, 1863--1.15 p.m. (Received 1.40 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       Learning that the enemy had massed his cavalry near Culpeper for the purpose of a raid, I dispatched General Pleasonton to attack him on his own ground. General Pleasonton crossed the Rappahannock on the 9th, at Beverly and Kelly's Fords, attacked the enemy, and drove him 3 miles, capturing over 200 prisoners and one battle-flag. This, in the face of vastly superior numbers, was only accomplished by hard and desperate fighting by our cavalry, for which they deserve much credit. Their morale is splendid. They made many hand-to-hand combats, always driving the enemy before them.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 12, 1863--1.30 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       There is no possibility of sending you more cavalry. Horses will be sent as fast as they can be procured.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


EXECUTIVE MANSION,
June 12, 1863-2 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       If you can show me a trial of the incendiary shells on Saturday night, I will try to join you at 5 p.m. that day. Answer.

A. LINCOLN.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 12, 1863--6.20 p.m. (Received 7 p.m.)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN,
President of the United Slates:

       If I am not very much mistaken, I shall be constrained to move my army on to the Orange and Alexandria Railroad before that time. I have three corps near there at this time.
       I presume that General Halleck showed you my dispatch of this morning; also please see copy of my dispatch to General Dix of today.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 12, 1863--9 p.m.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

       At the time of my reply to your telegram of to-day, I supposed at this was Thursday and not Friday. It will give me great pleasure to have the gun on exhibition at 5 p.m. to-morrow. I have some good targets in the shape of rebel camps which the gun will enfilade.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 13, 1863--11.30 a.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       I was coming down this afternoon, but if you prefer I should not, I shall blame you if you do not tell me so.

A. LINCOLN,
President.


JUNE 13, 1863.

The PRESIDENT:

       Mr. PRESIDENT: It may be well not to come.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General


JUNE 13, 1863--7 p.m. (Received 7.45 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

       All my sources of information confirm the statement that Longstreet's and Ewell's corps have passed through Culpeper and Sperryville, toward the Valley. The instructions of the President, approved by yourself, and your original letter of instructions, compel me, in view of this movement of the enemy, to transfer the operations of this army from the line of the Aquia to the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Accordingly, directions have been given for the First, Third, Fifth, and Eleventh Corps to rendezvous at Manassas Junction with the cavalry. The Second, Sixth, and Twelfth, with the Reserve Artillery, after covering the withdrawal of Government property from depots, have been directed to march to Dumfries, and from thence to be governed by the movements of the enemy, the object being to bring the two wings together as far in advance on that line as the movements of the enemy will justify.
       The corps will be withdrawn from their positions on the river to-night, the line being held by pickets until the proper time arrives for their withdrawal. To-morrow p.m. my headquarters will be at Dumfries.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 14, 1863--1.14 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       Do you consider it possible that 15,000 of Ewell's men can now be at Winchester?

A. LINCOLN.


DUMFRIES, June 14, 1863-5 p.m.-

Major-General HALLECK:

       At 3 p.m. Major-General Hancock informs me that the rebel troops opposite Franklin's Crossing are moving up the river, on the Plank road, in a continuous column. Major-General Hancock covers the withdrawal of the forces and property at that point. No effort has been made to force the passage of the Rappahannock, excepting at Banks' Ford.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


DUMFRIES, June 14, 1863--5.30 p.m.
(Received 5.40 p.m.)

Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War:

       Have received dispatch from General Milroy, dated yesterday. Will act on it as soon as I can hear from the column on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. Instructions were given for Thoroughfare Gap to be taken possession of and held by my cavalry last night. If the enemy should be making for Maryland, I will make the best dispositions in my power to come up with him.
       You may rely upon his being in great force wherever he is.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 14, 1863---5.50 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       So far as we can make out here, the enemy have Milroy surrounded at Winchester and Tyler at Martinsburg. If they could hold out a few days, could you help them? If the head of Lee's army is at Martinsburg and the tail of it on the Plank road between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, the animal must be very slim somewhere. Could you not break him?

A. LINCOLN.


ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 14, 1863---7.10 p.m.

The PRESIDENT:

       In answer to your dispatch concerning General Ewell, I must refer you to that of General Pleasonton, dated 6.05 p.m. to-day.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


DUMFRIES, June 14, 1863--8.30 p.m. (Received 9 p.m.)

       Mr. PRESIDENT: I have reason to believe that Longstreet's and the greater part of Ewell's corps marched from Culpeper, on the Sperryville road, on Sunday last [7th], and that a column, which occupied four hours in passing, followed on Thursday. If this was the case, the head of the column has had time to reach Winchester, and if it is a movement for invasion, it is a fair presumption to conclude that the bulk of his cavalry is with him. The enemy has in this column not less than between 70,000 and 80,000 men. A. P. Hill's corps, of about 30,000, is still on the south side of the Rappahannock, and General Hancock has just informed me that present appearances indicate that he intends to force the passage of the river in the morning. His troops have all been halted at and below Banks' Ford. My trains are all this side of Stafford Court-House, and the public property, I am informed, will be removed from Aquia to-morrow--the sick to-night.
       The First Corps is at Kettle Run; the Second on the Rappahannock; the Third and Fifth at Catlett's Station; the Sixth at Potomac Creek; the Eleventh at Centreville; and the Twelfth at Dumfries to-night.
       The Second will probably withdraw, the First march to Manassas, and the Sixth to Stafford Court-House during the night.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


DUMFRIES, June 14, 1863--11.15 p.m.
(Received 11.30 p.m.)

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

       Has anything further been heard from Winchester? Will the President allow me to inquire if it is his opinion that Winchester is surrounded by the rebel forces? I make this inquiry for the reason that General [I. R.] Trimble was recently assigned, in orders, to the <ar43_40> command of that district; and it is not known what command he had, unless his old one, which had Louisiana regiments in it, and it was in Jackson's, now Ewell's, corps. I do not feel like making a move for an enemy until I am satisfied as to his whereabouts. To proceed to Winchester and have him make his appearance elsewhere, would subject me to ridicule. With this feeling, unless otherwise directed, I feel it my duty to proceed to execute the movement indicated on yesterday. I will not, however, issue my order of march until the last moment, in the hope that further information may be received.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 14, 1863--11.55 p.m.
(Received June 15, 12.35 a.m.)

Major-General HOOKER:

       Yours of 11.30 [11.15] just received. You have nearly all the elements for forming an opinion whether Winchester is surrounded that I have. I really fear, almost believe, it is. No communication has been had with it during the day, either at Martinsburg or Harper's Ferry. At 7 p.m. we also lost communication with Martinsburg. The enemy had also appeared there some hours before. At 9 p.m. Harper's Ferry said the enemy was reported at Berryville and Smithfield. If I could know that Longstreet and Ewell moved in that direction so long ago as you stated in your last, then I should feel sure that Winchester is strongly invested. It is quite certain that a considerable force of the enemy is thereabout, and I fear it is an overwhelming one compared with Milroy's. I am unable to give you any more certain opinions.

A. LINCOLN.


WASHINGTON, June 14, 1863--12 midnight.

Major-General HOOKER
Dumfries:

       No doubt is entertained here that Milroy is surrounded at Winchester, and so closely invested that no scout or other information has been had from him later than 11 o'clock Saturday night. Tyler was also surrounded to-day at Martinsburg. Jenkins was there, and demanded the surrender of the place. Heavy firing was heard in that vicinity until 7 o'clock, and then ceased. The telegraphic communication was broken at the same time, and nothing is known here of the result. The report here is that Ewell's force is at Winchester; this comes from Milroy by the last dispatch sent by him, Saturday night, to General Schenck. Your dispatch has been sent to the President, who will probably reply soon.

EDWIN M. STANTON.


DUMFRIES. June 15, 1863--9.15 a.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

       The First, Third, Sixth, and Eleventh Corps, with the cavalry, will be assembled at Manassas and Centreville to-night. They have instructions to replenish their forage and rations, which I trust they will be able to do to-day. The Second Corps will be at Dumfries, the Sixth at Wolf Run Shoals, and the Twelfth at Fairfax Court-House to-night.
       Major-General Hancock reports that the rebel forces about Fredericksburg have moved in the direction of Culpeper this morning.
       To-night my headquarters will be at Fairfax Station. If your information from the Upper Potomac should be of a character to justify a movement in that direction, I request that I may be informed of it at the earliest practicable moment.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


DUMFRIES, June 15, 1863--10.20 a.m.

General HALLECK:

       Two of our best scouts returned from the interior, above Fredericksburg, yesterday (Sunday) morning. They report A. P. Hill, with sixty guns and 20,000 men, left on the heights about Fredericksburg. On Saturday p.m. 4,000 of this force moved toward Culpeper. On the same day, General Lee's headquarters were on the Lacy farm, between Brandy Station and Culpeper Court-House. Citizens say that the cavalry expedition was intended for Alexandria, while Lee was to go up the Valley. They believe that a great cavalry raid is now given up, as the cavalry is divided, a considerable part being still near Brandy Station. The passage of the infantry is traced across the Hazel River.
       The Richmond papers of the 13th blame Stuart much for allowing himself to be surprised in his camp by Pleasonton, and call upon him to do something to retrieve his reputation. Anxiety expressed concerning the movements on the Peninsula. Will send the papers to you.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,
Major-General, Chief of Staff.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 15, 1863--12.50 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       No information of enemy in direction of Winchester and Harper's Ferry as late as that from General Pleasonton.  The forces at Martinsburg are arriving at Harper's Ferry.

W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 15, 1863--2 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac :

       Garrison of Martinsburg has arrived at Harper's Ferry. Milroy did not obey orders given on the 11th to abandon Winchester, and probably has or will be captured. Harper's Ferry ought to hold out some time. Pleasonton's telegrams to you contain all the information we have of the enemy's movements. They are very contradictory. Your army is entirely free to operate as you desire against Lee's army, so long as you keep his main army from Washington. It is believed that Longstreet and Stuart are crossing the Potomac above and below Harper's Ferry. They certainly should be pursued. The force used for that purpose must depend upon your information of the movements or position of the remainder of Lee's army. Leesburg seems about the best point to move on first. The information sent here by General Pleasonton is very unsatisfactory. His suggestions to send batteries from here to the mouth of the Monocacy cannot be adopted.  If we had them to send, they would only be lost.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 15, 1863--4.05 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       General Meigs is apprehensive that you have not allowed time enough to withdraw material from Aquia Creek. Please prevent such wanton and wasteful destruction of public property as took place when Burnside withdrew from there last year.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


JUNE 15, 1863.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

       Only two Louisiana brigades in rebel army here. [H. T.] Hays' brigade, in Early's division, has the Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Louisiana. Prisoners from them would indicate the presence of Ewell's whole corps. IF. T.] Nicholls' brigade, in Trimble's division, has the First, Second, Tenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Louisiana. Prisoners from them would not indicate as above, as Trimble has lately been appointed to command the Valley District. Jenkins and Imboden have been in the Valley some time, and their forces are inconsiderable. Trimble's division is under 8,000.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Fairfax Station, June 15, 1863---6.30 p.m.
(Received 7.30 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       I have left a brigade at Aquia, and ordered them to hold it until further orders. I apprehend no danger there.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 15, 1863--8.30 p.m.
(Received 9. 15 p.m.)

Major-General HOOKER,
Fairfax Station,:

       The facts are now known here that Winchester and Martinsburg were both besieged yesterday. The troops from Martinsburg have got into Harper s Ferry without loss. Those from Winchester are also in, having lost in killed, wounded, and missing about one-third of their number. Of course, the enemy holds both places, and I think the report is authentic that he is crossing the Potomac at Williamsport. We have not heard of his yet appearing at Harper's Ferry or on the river anywhere below. I would like to hear from you.

A. LINCOLN.


FAIRFAX STATION, June 15, 1863.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT,
Washington:

       Your telegram of 8.30 p.m. received. It seems to disclose the intentions of the enemy to make an invasion, and, if so, it is not in my power to prevent it. I can, however, make an effort to check him Until he has concentrated all his forces. I may possibly be able to prevent the junction, and commence the movement during to-morrow. On so short reflection, I am not prepared to say this is the wisest move, nor do I know that my opinion on this subject is wanted. A. P. Hill moved up toward Culpeper this morning, indicating his intention to re-enforce their forces on the Upper Potomac.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General, Commanding.


JUNE 15, 1863--10 p.m.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

       Your dispatch, 8.30, received. My dispatch to General Halleck this morning shows my position to-night With regard to the enemy, your dispatch is more conclusive than any I have received. I now feel that invasion is his settled purpose. If so, he has more to accomplish, but with more hazard, by striking an easterly direction after crossing than a northerly one. It seems to me that he will be more likely to go north, and to incline to the west. He can have no design to look after his rear. It is an act of desperation on his part, no matter in what force he moves. It will kill copperheadism in the North. I do not know that my opinion as to the duty of this army in the case is wanted; if it should be, you know that I will be happy to give it. I have heard nothing of the movements of the enemy to-day, excepting that he has not attempted to follow me across the Rappahannock. I have only heard that all of A. P. Hill's forces moved up the river this morning, in the direction of Culpeper. If it should be determined for me to make a movement in pursuit, which I am not prepared to recommend at this time, I may possibly be able to move some corps to-morrow, and can reach the point of the enemy's crossing in advance of A. P. Hill. If I should move at once, he would probably wait until his forces are concentrated. If they are moving toward Maryland, I can better fight, them there than make running fight. If they come up in front of Washington, I can threaten and cut their communications, and Dix can be re-enforced from the south to act on their rear. I could not sit still and have them turn my right. My sources of information could not successfully cover such an extent of country as their movements indicate. I add these as suggestions for your consideration.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Fairfax Station, June 15, 1863--Midnight.
(Received June 16, 1.15 a.m.)

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

       I have received your dispatch of this evening. The Army of the Potomac is in this vicinity, excepting the Second and Sixth Corps, and, as they are marching in rear of all the trains, they will not be up before some time to-morrow.
       Perhaps the Second Corps will not be here until some time during to-morrow night. The First and Eleventh Corps were first to arrive on this line, but I have not yet learned whether they have drawn their supplies in readiness to march to-morrow morning or not. As soon as they are provided, they, as well as the others, will be put
en route.
       I have been informed that the enemy nowhere crossed the Rappahannock on our withdrawal from it, but General Hill's troops moved up the river in the direction of Culpeper this morning, for the purpose, I conclude, of re-enforcing Longstreet and Ewell, wherever they may be.
       I request that I may be informed what troops there are at Harper's Ferry, and who is in command of them, and also who is in command in this district.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


FAIRFAX STATION, June 16, 1863--7 a.m.
(Received 8.35 a.m.)

His Excellency President LINCOLN:

       It appears to me from General Couch's dispatch of last night, received this a.m., that nearly all the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac should at once be sent into Maryland by the most direct route. General Stahel has an abundance to perform all cavalry duty that will be required south of the Potomac. I merely make the suggestion. If any considerable body of enemy's infantry should be thrown across the Potomac, they will probably take the direction of his advance pickets, and in that event it seems to me that a heavy column of ours should be thrown as speedily as possible across the river at. Harper's Ferry, while another should be thrown over the most direct line covering Baltimore and Philadelphia. I only speak with reference to this army, as I know nothing of the location or numbers of troops at the disposal of the Government elsewhere.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Fairfax Station, June 16, 1863--11 a.m.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,
President, &c. :

       Please accept my suggestions in regard to what should be done in the spirit with which they were given. They were suggestions merely, for I have not the data necessary to form an enlightened opinion on the case. Upon general principles, I thought those were the movements to make.
       You have long been aware, Mr. President, that I have not enjoyed the confidence of the major-general commanding the army, and I can assure you so long as this continues we may look in vain for success, especially as future operations will require our relations to be more dependent upon each other than heretofore.
       It may be possible now to move to prevent a junction of A. P. Hilts corps with those of Ewell and Longstreet. If so, please let instructions to that effect be given me. As will appear to you, the chances for my doing this are much smaller than when I was on the Rappahannock, for, if he should hold the passes stoutly, he can cause me delay. You may depend upon it, we can never discover the whereabouts of the enemy, or divine his intentions, so long as he fills the country with a cloud of cavalry. We must break through that to find him:

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 16, 1863--11.30 a.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Fairfax Station :

       I do not think there is reliable information that the enemy has crossed the Potomac in any force. Where his main corps are, is still uncertain, and I know of no way to ascertain, excepting through your cavalry, which should be kept near enough to the enemy to at least be able to tell where he is. My suggestion of yesterday, to follow the enemy's advance, by moving a considerable force first to Leesburg, and thence as circumstances may require, is the best one I can make. Unless your army is kept near enough to the enemy to ascertain his movements, yours must be in the dark or on mere conjecture. Tyler is in command at Harper's Ferry, with, it is said, only 9,000 men, but, according to returns of the 11th, he should have at least 13,600. Heintzelman, as you must be aware, commands this department. Besides the divisions of Abercrombie and Stahel, near you, he has little or no movable troops. Telegraph direct to him in all matters connected with the use of his troops.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 16, 1863--3.50 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       There is now no doubt that the enemy is surrounding Harper's Ferry, but in what force I have no information. General Schenck says our force there is much less than before reported, and cannot hold out very long. He wished to know whether he may expect relief. He can hope for none, excepting from your army.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Fairfax Station, June 16, 1863--4. p.m.
(Received 4. 50 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       Just received your telegram. Please inform me whether our forces at Harper's Ferry are in the town or on the heights, and, if the latter, whether we hold Bolivar, Loudoun, or Maryland Heights, and which, if any; what bridges at Harper's Ferry, and where; from what direction is the enemy making his attack. I suppose it is a couple of long marches from here for troops without trains, but this, of course, will depend upon the position of the enemy.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Fairfax Station, June 16, 1863--7.30 p.m.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       In compliance with your directions, I shall march to the relief of Harper's Ferry. I put my column again in motion at 3 a.m. to-morrow. I expect to reach there in two days, and, if possible, earlier. The partial rest of to-day was not lost, being necessary to recruit from forced and heavy marches and fill up supplies.
       My headquarters at Farrall [?] Station to-morrow night.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.

(Copy to the President.)


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 16, 1863-8.20 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac :

       Information of enemy's actual position and force in front of Harper's Ferry is as indefinite as that in your front. Nearly everything is conjecture. The only position of the enemy mentioned is Halltown. The bridges across both rivers at Harper's Ferry are believed to be intact, and most of Tyler's troops on Maryland Heights. Loudoun Heights are not fortified, but swept by Maryland batteries. Your questions have been sent to Tyler, and his answer will be forwarded as soon as received. Any troops you can send to his relief should be in motion. A few of the enemy have shown themselves at Poolesville and Point of Rocks. No definite information of his movements from any place.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 16, 1863--9.40 p.m. (Received 9.50 p.m.)

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

       My orders are out to march at 3 o'clock to-morrow morning. It will be likely to be one of vigor and power. I am prepared to move without communications with any place for ten days. I hope to reach my objective point before the arrival of Hill's corps, should it be moving in that direction. If I do not know this fact, I will shortly, but of information to the north of the Potomac I really have nothing.
       I wish that it might be made the duty of some person in the telegraph office in Washington to keep me informed of the enemy's movements in Maryland.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 16, 1863---10 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       To remove all misunderstanding, I now place you in the strict military relation to General Halleck of a commander of one of the armies to the general-in-chief of all the armies. I have not intended differently, but as it seems to be differently understood, I shall direct him to give you orders and you to obey them.

A. LINCOLN.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 16, 1863--10.15 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       I have given no directions for your army to move to Harper's Ferry. I have advised the movement of a force, sufficiently strong to meet Longstreet, on Leesburg, to ascertain where the enemy is, and then move to the relief of Harper's Ferry, or elsewhere, as circumstances might require. With the remainder of your force in proper position to support this, I want you to push out your cavalry, to ascertain something definite about the enemy. You are in command of the Army of the Potomac, and will make the particular dispositions as you deem proper. I shall only indicate the objects to be aimed at. We have no positive information of any large force against Harper's Ferry, and it cannot be known whether it will be necessary to go there until you can feel the enemy and ascertain his whereabouts.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 16, 1863.
(Received
10.45 p.m.)

Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War :

       If General Cadwalader has gone to Pennsylvania, please request him to send me information of the rebel movements to the south of there. Also please have the newspapers announce that I am moving on to the James River line. I will mask my real movements in these parts.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 16, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER, Fairfax:

General Cadwalader has not gone to Pennsylvania, but is here waiting for orders. You shall be kept posted upon all information received here as to enemy's movements, but must exercise your own judgment as to its credibility. The very demon of lying seems to be about these times, and generals will have to be broken for ignorance before they will take the trouble to find out the truth of reports.

EDWIN M. STANTON.


WASHINGTON, June 17, 1863--9.30 a.m.


Major-General HOOKER:

       Mr. Eckert, superintendent of the telegraph office, answers me that he has sent, and will send you, everything that comes to the office.

A. LINCOLN.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Fairfax Station, June 17, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,
Commanding, &c. :

       Your dispatch of 10 p.m. received by me at 1 a.m. Will make the dispositions of my forces to comply with the objects aimed at in your dispatch.
       The advices heretofore received by telegraph from Washington have stated successively that Martinsburg and Winchester were invested and surrounded; that Harper's Ferry was closely invested, with urgent calls upon me for relief; that the enemy were advancing in three columns through Pennsylvania, and had driven in General Couch's pickets. Now I am informed, in substance, that General Schenck thinks it all arises from one of his wagon trains; that General Tyler, at Harper's Ferry, whose urgent calls, as represented to me, required under my instructions rapid movements in this direction, seems to think that he is in no danger.
       Telegraph operator just reports to me that Harper's Ferry is abandoned by our forces. Is this true?
       Directions nave been given for my cavalry to make a reconnaissance in the direction of Winchester and Harper's Ferry, for the purpose of ascertaining the whereabouts and strength of the enemy, and while this is being done, some of the infantry corps will be advanced by easy marches. As soon as the intentions of the enemy are known to me, I shall be able to advance with rapidity.
       My headquarters will be at Fairfax Station tonight.
       I should very much like to have reliable and correct information concerning the enemy on the north side of the Potomac.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 17, 1863-11.40 a.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

       No reliable information of rebel movements in Maryland. All telegrams of importance received here are immediately sent to you. All telegrams from you or to you are subject to the hourly inspection of the Secretary of War and the President. No important instructions have or Will be sent to you without their knowledge. It is important that the Department be kept advised of all your movements; not in detail, but their general character. Also send all the information you get of the enemy's movements and position.

H. W. HALLECK,
General in-Chief.


JUNE 17, 1863-2 p.m. (Received 4 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       Advice of the abandonment of Harper's Ferry renders forced marches unnecessary to relieve it. This army will be in position as follows to-night: One corps at Dranesville; one corps at Guilford Station; one corps on Goose Creek, near Trappe Rock; one corps at Gum Springs; one corps at Centreville; one corps at Sangster's Station; one corps at Fairfax Station. Headquarters at Fairfax Station to-night. Cavalry feeling up through Aldie toward Winchester.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 17, 1863-2.10 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

       I regret equally with you that reports from north side of the Potomac are so unreliable and contradictory, but they are given to you as received. What is meant by abandoning Harper's Ferry is merely that General Tyler has concentrated his force in the fortifications on Maryland Heights. No enemy in any force has been seen below Harper's Ferry, north of the river, and it is hoped that Tyler's cavalry may get something reliable above. So far, we have had only the wild rumors of panic-stricken people.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 17, 1863---7.45 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       My telegram of this morning [afternoon] has informed you what Is meant by the abandonment of Harper's Ferry--a mere change of position. It changes in no respect the objects you are to keep in view.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


FAIRFAX STATION, June 17, 1863--9.20 p.m.
(Received 10.40 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
Washington:

       I am in constant receipt of copies of dispatches from General Couch with regard to enemy at Chambersburg. Is there, in your opinion, any foundation for the reports? All my cavalry are out, and I have deemed it prudent to suspend any farther advance of the infantry until I have information that the enemy are in force in the Shenandoah Valley. I have just received dispatches from Pleasonton, dated 4.15 p.m. He ran against Fitzhugh Lee's brigade of cavalry near Aldie, and from prisoners learned that Stuart is at Middlebury; and it is further reported that there is no infantry on this side of the Blue Ridge. When the orderly left, Pleasonton had charged and driven Lee out of Aldie. All my cavalry are out.
       Has it ever suggested itself to you that this cavalry raid may be a cover to Lee's re-enforcing Bragg or moving troops to the West?

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 18, 1863. (Received 7.50 a.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       At my last advices from Pleasonton, he had captured 8 officers and the greater portion of two squadrons of Fitz Lee's brigade of Stuart's cavalry, and driven them out of Aldie.
       My instructions to him were to find out what was behind them. At 1 a.m. we received advices that looked as though White, with 400 cavalry, was at Point of Rocks. The Twelfth Corps was immediately ordered to Leesburg, and to hold it and the fords of the Potomac in that vicinity. I ought to have had a large cavalry force and two regiments of infantry at the mouth of the Monocacy last night. Having no means of telegraphic communication there, I am unadvised as to their arrival, and unable to give them orders by telegraph.
       A bridge sufficient to cross the Potomac is also to be at that point at noon to-day.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 18, 1863--11 a.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       I can get no information of the enemy other than that sent to you. Rumors from Pennsylvania are too confused and contradictory to be relied on. Officers and citizens are on a big stampede. They are asking me why does not General Hooker tell where Lee's army is; he is nearest to it. There are numerous suppositions and theories, but all is yet mere conjecture. I only hope for positive information from your front. General Heintzelman has a signal line to Sugar Loaf Mountain, and is directed to send you all the information he obtains. General Kelley is observing the passes west of the Shenandoah, and will give you, through General Schenck, all information he can get. He is very reliable.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 18, 1863---9 a.m. (Received 10 a.m.)

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       Prisoners from Pleasonton's fight---9 officers and 66 men--now on the way to this camp.
       Advices received of the arrival of my cavalry force and pontoons at mouth of Monocacy. Sixth Corps moved up to Germantown. I would request that signal officers be established at Crampton's Pass and South Mountain. They can see the whole country north of the Potomac, and telegraph movements of any column. If my advices of to-day make it advisable, I shall seize and hold those passes. It may be necessary to use General Schenck's troops for that purpose.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 18, 1863--10.07 a.m. (Received 10.15 a.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       GENERAL: I have to request that Brigadier-General Pleasonton, for his gallant conduct at Chancellorsville, his services there, and his attack and surprise of Stuart's force, superior in numbers, on the Rappahannock, Junne 9, may be made major-general, and assigned to command the cavalry corps.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.

(Copy to the President and Secretary of War.)


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 18, 1863--1 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       Your telegram for a signal station at Crampton's Pass and South Mountain has been sent to Colonel Myer, with directions to carry out your wishes, if he has the means. General Schenck has been notified that you will have control of any of his forces that are within the sphere of your operations. If you want anything of General Schenck or General Heintzelman, telegraph to them direct. Copies of each telegram are always retained at the War Department for the information of the Government. * *

H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.


JUNE 19, 1863--12 noon.

Major-General HALLECK:

       I have asked Generals Schenck and Heintzelman for information as to the location, character, and number of their commands. Please direct it to be furnished. I have directed General Stahel to concentrate his cavalry for movement. Please inform General Heintzelman. Are orders for these commands to be given by me where I deem it necessary? The nature of the control to be exercised by me I would like to have distinctly and clearly fixed and understood by Generals Heintzelman and Schenck, that I may not seem to avoid proper channels or to act discourteously toward them.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 19, 1863. (Received 12 m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       I have just been furnished with an extract from the New York Herald of yesterday concerning the late movements of this army. So long as the newspapers continue to give publicity to our movements, we must not expect to gain any advantage over our adversaries. Is there no way of stopping it? I can suppress the circulation of this paper within my lines, but I cannot prevent their reaching it to the enemy. We could well afford to give millions of money for like information of the enemy.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 19, 1863--1.55 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

        I appreciate as fully as yourself the injury resulting from newspaper publication of the movements, numbers, and position of our troops, but I see no way of preventing it as long as reporters are permitted in our camps. I expelled them all from our lines in Mississippi. Every general must decide for himself what persons he will permit in his camps.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 19, 1863--2 p.m.
(Received 2.10 p.m.)

H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

       Do you give credit to the reported movements of the enemy as stated in the Chronicle, of this morning?

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 19, 1863--3.55 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       I do not know to what particular statement in the Chronicle you refer. There are several which are contradictory. It now looks very much as if Lee had been trying to draw your right across the Potomac, so as to attack your left. But of that it is impossible to judge until we know where Lee's army is. No large body has appeared either in Maryland or Western Virginia.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


JUNE 19, 1863--7.30 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

       Reports just received from General Pleasonton, at Aldie, state General [D. McM.] Gregg has been fighting nearly all day--driven the enemy through Middleburg, in direction of Upperville; has already sent in between 50 and 60 prisoners, one a lieutenant-colonel, and a number of officers of less rank, all from North Carolina. The force encountered was [B. H.] Robertson's brigade, North Carolina troops, supported by two other brigades, all under command of Stuart. Considerable loss inflicted upon the enemy. My corps are to-night as follows: Twelfth, Slocum, Leesburg.
       Eleventh, Howard, on Goose Creek, 4 miles from Leesburg, toward Aldie.
       Fifth, Meade, at Aldie.
       First, Reynolds, at Herndon Station and vicinity, on Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad.
       Third, Birney, at Gum Spring. Second, Hancock, at Centreville. Sixth, Sedgwick, at Germantown.
       Pleasonton rests his cavalry at Aldie to-night.
       Notwithstanding dispatch sent me by General Tyler, at Williamsport, his [Lee's] delay in my front has caused me to doubt his intention of throwing over any considerable force on Maryland shore. It is the impression of General Pleasonton that his infantry are still on opposite side of Blue Ridge, and that it is his intention to attack in this direction.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 20, 1863--5.30 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

       I have moved up Second Corps to Thoroughfare Gap; a division of Second Corps at Gainesville; a division of Sixth Corps at Bristoe: other forces unchanged.
       Pleasonton reports Stuart's force in front of him, beyond Middleburg. He will attack him with all his available command early to-morrow. Their cavalry have mounted infantry with them. Infantry soldiers captured report to Pleasonton that Longstreet's rear passed through the Blue Ridge yesterday. I have directed a bridge to be laid at Edwards Ferry to-night.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General


WASHINGTON, June 21, 1863--9 a.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       Operator at Leesburg just now tells us that firing commenced about 7 this morning in direction from here of Aldie's Gap and Middleburg ; has continued all day, and has receded from him, and is apparently now about White Plains; was very heavy this morning, but lighter now.

A. LINCOLN.


CAMP, June 21, 1863--5 p.m. (Received 5.30 p.m.)

The PRESIDENT:

       Pleasonton's cavalry and two brigades of Meade's infantry were directed to attack Stuart's cavalry this morning. The fight commenced about 7 o'clock, and for several hours raged with great violence. As the sound receded from us, I conclude that the enemy were whipped, and I feel confident that our forces are now driving them across the Blue Ridge, perhaps at Snicker's Gap. All of the passes in the Blue Ridge, so far as I know, are stoutly held by the enemy, but I was in hopes that Pleasonton would be able to push his adversary so closely as to cross the mountain in their company.
       This cavalry force has hitherto prevented me from obtaining satisfactory information as to the whereabouts of the enemy. They have masked all of their movements. I have not yet received a word from the front since the beginning of the fight; from this I conclude the space between me and them has been lengthened since morning.
       The cavalry and all the troops are in glorious spirits, and the former have achieved wonders in the last few days.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 22, 1863--9.30 a.m.
(Received
10.50 a.m.)

The PRESIDENT:

       Mr. PRESIDENT: My latest advices from General Pleasonton dated 4.30 p.m., the 21st. At that time he had driven the rebel cavalry through Upperville, capturing some of his artillery, and still pursuing. Appearances favorable.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
Washington, D. C, June 22, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       Orders will be issued placing all that part of the Eighth Corps and of the Middle Department east of Cumberland under your immediate orders. The Department of Washington will continue as heretofore, your orders being given direct to General Heintzelman, he reporting them to headquarters before executing them, where they conflict with his special instructions. Affairs in Middle Department are represented as unsatisfactory. I go immediately to Baltimore to ascertain their condition.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, June 22, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER:

       Operator at Leesburg just now says:

"I heard very little firing this a.m. about daylight, but it seems to have stopped now. It was in about same direction as yesterday, but farther off."

A. LINCOLN


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 22, 1863--3.15 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       In order to give compactness to the command of troops in the field covering Washington and Baltimore, it is proposed to place that part of the Middle Department east of Cumberland, now commanded by General Schenck, under your direct orders. The President directs me to ask you if that arrangement would be agreeable. Please answer as early as possible.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


JUNE 22, 1863--4.30 p.m. (Received 4.45 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       Your telegram of 3.15 p.m. to-day is received. In reply, I have to state yes, provided that the same authority is continued to me that I now have, which is to give orders direct to the troops in the departments of Generals Schenck and Heintzelman.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 24, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       The aspect of the enemy is not much changed from yesterday. Ewell, I conclude, is over the river, and is now up the country, I suppose, for purposes of plunder. The yeomanry of that district should be able to check any extended advance of that column, and protect themselves from their aggression.
       Of the troops that marched to the river at Shepherdstown yesterday, I cannot learn that any have crossed, and as soon as I do I shall commence moving, myself, and, indeed, am preparing my new acquisitions for that event; the others are ready. General French is now on his way to Harper's Ferry, and I have given directions for the force at Poolesville to march and report to him, and also for all of Stahel's cavalry, and, if I can do it without attracting observation, I shall send over a corps or two from here, in order, if possible, to sever Ewell from the balance of the rebel army, in case he should make a protracted sojourn with his Pennsylvania neighbors.
       If the enemy should conclude not to throw any additional force over the river, I desire to make Washington secure, and, with all the force I can muster, strike for his line of retreat in the direction of Richmond.
       I cannot learn the strength of Heintzelman's and Schenck's commands, nor where they are stationed, and hence I send my chief of staff to Washington and Baltimore to ascertain, and also to start out a column of about 15,000 men on the National road as far as Frederick City. In any contingency, whether of an advance or retreat of the enemy, the defense of Washington or Baltimore, this amount of force should be there, and they should be held in readiness to march, which fact I will not be able to know until I put them on the road. I will send the best officers I have to command this body. I desire that instructions may be given Generals Heintzelman and Schenck to direct their commands to obey promptly any orders they may receive from me.
       Last evening the colonel commanding at Poolesville responded to his orders to march that he did not belong to my command, but would refer his orders to General Heintzelman. Such delays may bring us reverses. When these instructions are given, I shall not be necessitated to repeat orders to any part of my command to march on the enemy.
       Allow me to suggest that the new troops arriving in Baltimore and Washington be at once put in the defenses, and the old ones, excepting those serving with the artillery, be put in marching condition. If this should be done quickly, I think that we may anticipate glorious results from the recent movement of the enemy, whether he should determine to advance or retreat.
       I request that my orders be sent me to-day, for outside of the Army of the Potomac I don't know whether I am standing on my head or feet.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D. C., June 24, 1863--2.30 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       General Schenck has been notified that the troops of his department in Harper's Ferry and vicinity would obey all orders direct from you, and that he would obey your orders in regard to the other troops of his command. They, however, are nearly all militia.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in. Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 25, 1863. (Received 11 a.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       Subjoined is a dispatch this moment received. It speaks for itself. I request that General Slough be arrested at once, and charges will be forwarded as soon as I have time to prepare them. You will find, I fear, when it is too late, that the effort to preserve department lines will be fatal to the cause of the country.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

UPTON'S HILL, June 25, 1863.

Major-General BUTTERFIELD:

       A dispatch has been received during the night from General Slough, military governor of Alexandria, informing me that the commanding officer of the Second Brigade, Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, has been instructed by him not to recognize the orders sent to him to prepare to join the division, as directed in your dispatch of June 23.

S. W. CRAWFORD,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25, 1863--2 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       The Second Brigade, to which you refer in your telegram, forms no part of General Crawford's command, which was placed at your orders. No other troops can be withdrawn from the Defenses of Washington.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, I). C., June 25, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac :

       The immense loss and destruction of horses in your army, and the difficulty of supplying this loss, render it necessary that you should impress every serviceable animal likely to fall into the hands of the enemy. There are many animals in Loudoun County and the adjacent parts of Maryland. These should be seized, to save them from the enemy, as well as to supply yourself.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, June 25, 1863.

General HOOKER:

       The President has assigned General Hancock to the command of the Second Corps.

E. D. TOWNSEND,
Assistant Adjutant-General.


POOLESVILLE, June 26, 1863.
(Received 8.15 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
Washington :

       I desire every facility to be in readiness for supplies to be thrown to Frederick by rail.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 26, 1863--7 p.m. (Received 7.30 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

       IS there any reason why Maryland Heights should not be abandoned after the public stores and property are removed?
       I propose to visit the place to-morrow, on my way to Frederick, to satisfy myself on that point. It must be borne in mind that I am here with a force inferior in numbers to that of the enemy, and must have every available man to use on the field.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General, Commanding.


JUNE 26, 1863--8 p.m.
(Received 9.15 p.m.)

Hon. E. M. STANTON,
Secretary of War:

       I would respectfully request that Major-General Stahel may be ordered by telegraph to report to General Couch, with a view to organizing and putting in an efficient condition any mounted troops that can be raised for service there. His presence here as senior major-general will much embarrass me and retard my movements.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


POOLESVILLE, June 26, 1863--6 p.m.

Maj. T. T. ECKERT:

       Dispatch received. My compliments to the President, and inform him that I had not that honor.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


JUNE 26, 1863---8 p.m. (Received 9.10 p.m.)

His Excellency President LINCOLN:

       You need not believe any more than you choose of what is published in the Associated Press dispatches concerning this army to-morrow. Was it from the newspapers that you received a report, or an idea, that I was in Washington last night?

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, June 27, 1863--8 a.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

       It did not come from the newspapers, nor did I believe it, but I wished to be entirely sure it was a falsehood.

A. LINCOLN


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Poolesville, Md., June 27, 1863.
(Received 9 a.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief :

       That there may be no misunderstanding as to my force, I would respectfully state that, including the portions of General Heintzelman's command, and General Schenck's, now with me, my whole force of enlisted men for duty will not exceed 105,000. Fourteen batteries of the Artillery Reserve have been sent to Washington. Of General Abercrombie's force, one brigade has just been sent home from expiration of service, and the others go shortly. One brigade of General Crawford's force has not reported with it. I state these facts that there may not be expected of me more than I have material to do with.
       My headquarters at Frederick to-night. Three corps at Middletown, one corps at Knoxville, two at Frederick, and the remaining infantry corps very near there to-night.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.

(Copy for President.)


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
June 27, 1863

GENERAL-IN-CHIEF AND WAR DEPARTMENT,
Washington :

       General Hooker personally has just left here for Harper's Ferry, where he will be about 11 o'clock, Point of Rocks about 10 a.m., and at Frederick to-night. Copies of all dispatches should be sent to Frederick and Harper's Ferry up to 11 a.m., and after that to Frederick. The staff are just leaving here for Frederick.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,
Major-General, Chief of Staff.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 27, 1863--10.30 a.m.

General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       Major [James C.] Duane and Captain [George H.] Mendell were ordered to your army, and it is presumed that they are en route. I do not know where they now are, unless in your army. Maryland Heights have always been regarded as an important point to be held by us, and much expense and labor incurred in fortifying them. I cannot approve their abandonment, except in case of absolute necessity.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., June 27, 1863-12 m.

Major-General HOOKER,
Army of the Potomac:

       Major-General Stahel is relieved from duty in the Army of the Potomac, and will report to General Couch, at Harrisburg, to organize and command the cavalry in the Department of the Susquehanna. Lowell's cavalry is the only force for scouts in this department, and cannot be taken from General Heintzelman's command.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


SANDY HOOK, June 27, 1863.
(Received 2.55 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       I have received your telegram in regard to Harper's Ferry. I find 10,000 men here, in condition to take the field. Here they are of no earthly account. They cannot defend a ford of the river, and, as far as Harper's Ferry is concerned, there is nothing of it. As for the fortifications, the work of the troops, they remain when the troops are withdrawn. No enemy will ever take possession of them for them. This is my opinion. All the public property could have been secured to-night, and the troops marched to where they could have been of some service. Now they are but a bait for the rebels, should they return.
       I beg that this may be presented to the Secretary of War and His Excellency the President.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


SANDY HOOK, June 27, 1863--1 p.m.
(Received 3 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

       My original instructions require me to cover Harper's Ferry and Washington. I have now imposed upon me, in addition, an enemy in my front of more than my number. I beg to be understood, respectfully, but firmly, that I am unable to comply with this condition with the means at my disposal, and earnestly request that I may at once be relieved from the position I occupy.

JOSEPH HOOKER,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON D.C.,
June 27, 1863 --8 PM

Major General. HOOKER
Army of the Potomac.

       Your Application to be relieved from your present command is received.
       As you were appointed to this command by the President, I have no power to relieve you. Your dispatch has been duly referred for executive action.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.

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