Reports of Brig. Gen. Louis Hébert, C. S. Army, Commanding Brigade.
MAY 19-JULY 4, 1863.--The Siege of Vicksburg, Miss.
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/2 [S# 37]

HEADQUARTERS HÉBERT'S BRIGADE,
May 21, 1863.

Maj. S. CROOM,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report, as far as can be ascertained, the effect of to-day's engagement on the line of my brigade. Soon after daylight, the enemy opened their batteries and line of sharpshooters, and kept up their fire with rapidity and serious effect during the day, to dark; even since an occasional shot is fired from one of their batteries. Besides undergoing the fire on my brigade front, my extreme right has suffered from the sharpshooters on the left of Brigadier-General Moore, and very severely from a battery in front of Brigadier-General Moore. This battery has been very effective against my headquarters.
        The enemy's sharpshooters are in close proximity, and their batteries have injured much of our parapets. The two 20-pounder Parrotts remaining on my line have been dismounted, and are unserviceable. One 12-pounder howitzer is disabled, though it may yet fire a few shots. Damages will be repaired as far as practicable to-night.
        Casualties.--Killed: Captain Gomez, Twenty-third Louisiana Infantry; Captains Chrisman and Tatom, Thirty-sixth Mississippi, and 3 enlisted men. Wounded: Capt. C. A. Bruslé, aide-de-camp, and 12 enlisted men.

Respectfully submitted.
LOUIS HEBÉRT,
Brigadier-General.


HEADQUARTERS HÉBERT'S BRIGADE,
June 9, 1863.

Maj. S. CROOM,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report that, for two days before, the enemy had been advancing their works on the Jackson road, under the cover of cotton bales placed on a car, which car was moved along at will. Yesterday I directed Lieutenant-Colonel Russell, of the Third Louisiana Regiment, to make an attempt to destroy this cotton, and, if necessary, I would order some volunteers to dash forward and fire the cotton. The lieutenant-colonel, however, invented a safer and a much simpler course. He procured spirits of turpentine and tow, and, wrapping his musket-balls with the same, fired them, with light charges, into the cotton bales. His attempt succeeded admirably. The cotton was soon burning, and our sharpshooters, having been well instructed, prevented the fire from being extinguished or the cotton rolled away. Lieutenant-Colonel Russell reports that the car and over twenty bales of cotton on it were destroyed. He says that the car was composed of the platform of a freight railroad car, and the wheels apparently iron. The car was at a distance of some 75 yards from our works when destroyed, at 10 p.m. yesterday. Lieutenant-Colonel Russell deserves commendation for his success.

I am, major, respectfully, your obedient servant,
LOUIS HÉBERT,
Brigadier-General.

[Indorsement.]

DIVISION HEADQUARTERS,
June 9, 1863.

        Respectfully forwarded for the information of the lieutenant-general commanding. This report was not made until after my return from Vicksburg this morning.

JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS HÉBERT'S BRIGADE,
June 26, 1863.

Maj. S. CROOM,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: Kept out at the trenches during the entire night, and afflicted to-day with a fever, I have failed to this time to hand in my usual daily report.
        The night of the 24th passed off with little firing on my line, and no change was visible, except the nearer approach of saps and the addition of newly thrown-up earth at several points.
        During the 25th, the enemy continued his labors, but no movements of troops were seen. The skirmishing was as usual. At 5 p.m. rapid musketry firing on our right seemed to indicate an attack on the Baldwin's Ferry road and farther to the right. Up to about 5.30 p.m. there was no indication of a projected attack on the Jackson road. At that hour the enemy sprang his mine under the main redan, on the left of the road, and advanced to the assault. His attempt was a feeble one, and was easily defeated; but few of his men could be brought to mount the breach, and, with the exception of one officer (supposed to be a field officer, leading the forlorn hope), evinced [no] determination. He mounted the parapet, waved and called his men forward, but was instantly shot down. After his repulse, the enemy occupied the outer slope of our works, and from there commenced, accompanied by musketry fire, a terrific shower of hand.grenades upon our men. We replied with grenades and sharpshooters, and this species of combat is still going on this morning. Everything indicates that during the night the enemy did a great deal of work, and is likely to have started new mines. At any rate, he has given shelter in our outer ditch to his men by throwing up sand-bags, &c. He is now in position to appear in our works at any instant. As soon as any indication of an attack became apparent, Col. Eugene Erwin moved his reserve regiment (the Sixth Missouri Infantry) to the line. At the assault, he gallantly attempted to lead some of his men to follow him over the parapet. Whilst on the top he was instantly killed. In him the army has lost a true and distinguished soldier--one who promised to gain high rank and position.
        After the first charge, the enemy attempted to advance by covering himself with logs and pieces of timber. He was made to fall back several times by the rapid and well directed fire of a piece of our artillery commanded by Lieutenant [C. C.] Scott (Appeal Battery). He has, however, in the night succeeded in covering his men.
        Three regimental flags alone were seen at any time, and it is my belief that the enemy never contemplated but an assault to secure the redan, and there hold. This he undoubtedly thought of doing during the confusion that would exist, as he conceived, in our troops. He was, however, quite mistaken, as the explosion created no dismay or panic among our brave officers and soldiers, and every one was ready for the foe before he appeared.
        At the time of the explosion, 6 enlisted men of the Forty-third Mississippi Regiment were at work in the shaft, which our engineers were digging in the redan to meet the enemy's line. These soldiers were necessarily lost. Not another man was injured by the explosion. This is attributable to the shaft in question, which served as a vent upward to the force of the blast, and thus confined the breaking up of the soil to a shorter distance in the direction of the perpendicular of the redan.
        At 10 p.m. Col. James McCown, with his Fifth Missouri Regiment (infantry), reported as re-enforcement. He was ordered by me to take position in the ravine, where the Sixth Missouri has been camped, in the rear of the Third Louisiana.
        Colonel Cockrell, however, soon appeared in the trenches as commander of the two Missouri regiments, and at once brought the Fifth to the line, generously relieving three companies of the fatigued Third Louisiana. The brave Missourians have added laurels to their already glorious renown. As to my own troops, I have but to say that they have done their duty nobly.

In the list of casualties, I deem it proper to include the Sixth and Fifth Missouri.

Casualties.

Command Officers
Killed
Enlisted
Killed
Officers
Wounded
Enlisted
Wounded
Remarks
3rd Louisiana ---- 6 2 19 Major [D.] Pierson and Lieut. [W.P.] Renwick, Company B, wounded
36th Mississippi ---- ---- ---- 3  
37th Mississippi ---- 1 ---- 3 Slightly Wounded
38th Mississippi ---- 1 ---- 3  
43rd Mississippi ---- 6 ---- 5 Six buried by explosion of mine.
7th Mississippi Battalion ---- ---- ---- ----  
21st and 23rd [22nd] Louisiana ---- 4 ---- 7 The 4 killed and 6of the wounded are of Captain [J.C.] Theard's company, twenty-third Lousiiana Regiment
5th Missouri ---- 1 ---- 7  
6th Missouri 2 1 2 20 Colonel Erwin and Lieut. W.S. Lispscomp, Company A, killed; Capt. John D. Parsons and Lieut. James R. Harper, Company I, wounded.
Appeal Battery ---- ---- 1 ---- Lieutenant Scott slightly wounded.
Emanuel's Battery ---- ---- ---- 1  
Total 2 19 5 68  

    Total killed and wounded in Hébert's brigade 61
    Total killed and wounded in Fifth and Sixth Missouri Regiments. 33
    Total 94

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
LOUIS HÉBERT,
Brigadier-General.


HEADQUARTERS HÉBERT'S BRIGADE,
July
1, 1863.

Maj. S. CROOM,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report that at about 1.30 p.m. the enemy sprang another and a larger mine under the main redan of the work on the left of the Jackson road, this time destroying the parapet of the redan. Our interior work is uninjured. The enemy attempted no immediate charge after the blast, but opened a brisk artillery fire. The change occasioned exposes a portion of our troops heretofore protected, and there is necessity of immediate work, both to strengthen our interior line and give more protection to exposed points. Lieutenant Blessing, assistant engineer on this portion of the line, was wounded a few hours since. I earnestly ask that some other officer be immediately sent to replace him.

I am, major, respectfully, your obedient servant,
LOUIS HEBÉRT,
Brigadier-General.

[ Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
July
1, 1863.

        Respectfully forwarded for the information of the lieutenant-general, and with the request that an engineer officer be detailed at once in the place of Lieutenant Blessing.

JNO. H. FORNEY,
Major-general.


HEADQUARTERS HÉBERT'S BRIGADE, J
July
2, 1863.

Major-General FORNEY:

        GENERAL: In answer to your note of this date giving copy of a note to you from the lieutenant-general commanding, of yesterday, inquiring into the condition of the troops, and their ability to make the marches and undergo the fatigues necessary to accomplish a successful evacuation I respectfully state that, with the permission granted by your note, I have consulted with and obtained the opinions of my most trustworthy and reliable officers, confidentially placing before them the question of cutting out. I asked them if their men were physically able to "make the marches and undergo the fatigues necessary." Without exception all concurred in one single and positive opinion--that their men could not fight and march 10 miles in one day; that even without being harassed by the enemy or having to fight, they could not expect their men to march 15 miles the first day; hundreds would break down or straggle off even before the first lines of the enemy were fairly passed. This inability on the part of the soldiers does not arise from want of spirit, or courage, or willingness to fight, but from real physical disability, occasioned by the men having been so long shut up and cramped up in pits, ditches, &c., in the trenches; many are also in ill-health, who still are able to remain in the works. The unanimous opinion of my officers I fully concur in, and I unhesitatingly declare that it is my sincere conviction that, so far as my brigade is concerned, it cannot undergo the marches and fatigues of an evacuation. The spirit of my men to fight is unbroken, but their bodies are worn out. Left to their choice to "surrender" or "cut their way out," I have no doubt that a large majority would say " cut out." But the question to my mind for me to answer is not between " surrender" and "cutting out;" it is are my men able to "cut out." My answer is No! I believe, general, the above is an answer to your note, but I may be permitted to state that most of my brigade are Mississippians, who I am confident will leave the ranks, and, throwing away their arms, make their way home the moment we leave our works. So long as they are fighting for Vicksburg they are as true soldiers as the army has, but they will certainly leave us so soon as we leave Vicksburg. If caught without arms by the enemy, they will be no worse off than other prisoners of war. -If they succeed in getting home, they will not be brought back to the army for months, and many not at all, as the homes of many are within Federal lines. I conclude, general, by repeating that I am convinced that my brigade is not in condition to make the marches and undergo the fatigues necessary to a successful evacuation.
        And I unhesitatingly state that I could not expect to keep together one-tenth of my men a distance of 10 miles.

I am, general, sincerely yours,
LOUIS HÉBERT,
Brigadier-General.


HEADQUARTERS HÉBERT'S BRIGADE,
Vicksburg, July 9, 1863.

Maj. S. CROOM,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Forney's Division.

        MAJOR: I have the honor respectfully to submit the following report: On May 17 last, I was stationed at Snyder's Mill, on the Yazoo River, in command of the Confederate forces at that point. This position I had occupied since January 2.
        On May 17, at 11 a.m., I received orders to prepare to evacuate the place and to send into Vicksburg the commissary stores, and to have driven in all the cattle, hogs, and sheep that could be gathered in the neighboring country. Having but a very small number of wagons and but a few mounted men, I, however, commenced carrying out my instructions as far as practicable. At 2.45 p.m. I received orders to send to Vicksburg all ordnance stores, and to prepare to spike or destroy the heavy guns. All remaining wagons were loaded with ordnance stores, and Col. Isaac W. Patton put to work to prepare the guns for spiking or destruction. Colonel Patton was the commander of my heavy artillery. At 5.30 p.m. I received the orders to march my command to Vicksburg, leaving two companies at Snyder's Mill, under an efficient officer, to keep up a show of occupation, and to spike or destroy the guns and destroy remaining stores when the enemy would be discovered approaching the position. At the same time I was ordered to send all our transports and storeboats then at Haynes' Bluff to the Upper Yazoo, above Fort Pemberton. All the boats left in the evening and night, carrying off such stores as were on board at the time. Lieut. Col. J. T. Plattsmier, with two companies of his regiment (the Twenty-first Louisiana), was assigned to the duty of holding the place and of destroying the guns and stores remaining when the necessity for so doing occurred.
        Having made all arrangements possible under existing circumstances with reference to the post of Snyder's Mill, I moved with my command at 7.30 p.m. by the Valley road to Vicksburg, where I reported myself at 2.30 o'clock on the morning of May 18. I was immediately ordered to the trenches, with instructions to occupy the line commencing with the works on the immediate right of the Jackson road, and extending to the left, so as to occupy the main redan on the Graveyard road. These dispositions were all made by 8 o'clock in the morning. I found in the main redan, on the left of the Jackson road, one 20-pounder Parrott gun, of Waddell's artillery, under Lieutenant [T. Jeff.] Bates. Early in the day, Col. Isaac W. Patton received orders directly from the lieutenant-general commanding to return to Snyder's Mill for the purpose of disposing of the guns and stores left there. These orders relieved Lieutenant-Colonel Plattsmier of the charge I had assigned him, and I have therefore no report to make of what was really finally abandoned at Snyder's Mill.
        On May 18, soon after my command had been placed in the trenches, the enemy made his appearance in front of my line, pressing forward on the Graveyard road, as if intending an assault. Taking one regiment and one battalion from my right, I sent them to re-enforce my left. After this change, and up to June 2, my troops were disposed as follows: Commencing with my right, in the main work, on the immediate right of the Jackson road, Twenty-first Louisiana Regiment (with Companies C and D, of the Twenty-third [Twenty-second] Louisiana Regiment, attached), Third Louisiana Regiment, Forty-third Mississippi Regiment, Thirty-eighth Mississippi Regiment, Thirty-seventh Mississippi Regiment, Seventh Mississippi Battalion, Thirty-sixth Mississippi Regiment. The artillery was distributed along the line, with a few pieces kept in reserve.
        At about 3.45 p.m. on the 18th, the enemy opened artillery on the Graveyard road, but no attempt at a charge was made, as had been anticipated. His skirmishers pressed forward, however, and by night our skirmishers (by direction of the lieutenant-general commanding) were drawn into our lines, pickets alone being put out for the night.
        By the morning of the 19th, the enemy had planted several batteries along my front, on the Jackson and Graveyard roads, and his strong line of sharpshooters was within easy musket range of our works. He had also commenced his line of works, and, so far as my front was concerned, he may be said to have completed his investment. The peremptory orders to draw in our skirmishers, not to use our artillery except against advancing columns of infantry, or against artillery being placed in battery (all to save ammunition), allowed the enemy to at once make his investment a close one, and to commence his trenches, saps, &c., in close proximity to our works. From that time our entire line became subject to a murderous fire, and nearly every cannon on my line was in time either dismounted or otherwise injured.
        At about 10 a.m. on May 19, an attack was made on the Graveyard road, extending along the front of Major-General Smith's right and the front of my two regiments and battalion on my left. Seeing the advancing columns, I directed Lieutenant Dates' 20-pounder Parrott and a 3-inch rifle piece of the Appeal Battery in the work on the Jackson road to open upon them. This was done with very good effect. The enemy, however, several times pressed on to the assault, but were as often repulsed, notwithstanding the effort of the officers. Before long he fell back discomfited, having suffered severely.
        On the 21st and 22d, he rapidly pushed on his works in intrenching, sapping, constructing batteries, &c., under cover of heavy sharpshooting and cannonading.
        On the 22d, he again advanced to the assault, and apparently with serious and strong determination. On my line his points of attack were the Jackson and Graveyard roads. He charged three times on the Graveyard road and twice on the Jackson road, but was as often repulsed with very heavy loss. A small number only succeeded in reaching our exterior ditch. At the redan of the Twenty-first Louisiana, a few scaling-ladders reached the outer ditch, but were not planted. By dark the enemy had fallen back, severely punished and discomfited. From that time he seemed to abandon all hope of taking our works by assault, and applied himself assiduously to the reduction of our line by regular and systematic approach.
        On June 2, other troops having been ordered to occupy the works held by my left, I moved the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-eighth Mississippi Regiments and the Seventh Mississippi Battalion to the right, placing them as follows: The Thirty-eighth along the Jackson road, between the Third and Twenty-first Louisiana; the Seventh Battalion on the right of the Twenty-first Louisiana, and the Thirty-sixth Regiment on the right of the battalion, having massed the Third and Twenty-first Louisiana more compactly to give room for these dispositions.
        In this order my troops remained until June 25, when, moving the Third Louisiana still to the left, room was made for the Sixth Missouri Regiment (Col. Eugene Erwin) between the Thirty-eighth Mississippi and Third Louisiana.
        On this day (June 25), at about 5.30 p.m., and before the Sixth Missouri entered the trenches, the enemy sprang his first mine under the redan of the Third Louisiana, and made an effort to storm the breach effected. He was promptly met and signally repulsed. He, however, occupied our exterior slope and ditch, and till late in the night a brisk fight with sharpshooting and hand.grenades was kept up on both sides. At the time the mine was exploded, 6 enlisted men of the Forty-third Mississippi were at work in a shaft sunk in the terre-plein of the redan for the purpose of countermining. These men were all buried and lost. Col. Eugene Erwin sprang on the parapet to lead a charge against the enemy in the exterior ditch. He was shot and instantly killed, the service thus losing a brave, accomplished, and distinguished officer.
        In the mean time, before June 25, the enemy had placed heavy guns in very close range on the Jackson road and had demolished a large amount of our parapet. He had also, by erecting daily new batteries, approaching and elevating his sharpshooters, compelled us to work incessantly night and day repairing our parapets, constructing new lines, digging new pits, &c. He had also commenced shelling, with serious effect, from a mortar on the Jackson road.
        From June 25 to July 1, he pressed forward his works and continued his telling fire on our line. On this last day, at about 1.30 p.m., he sprang his second mine under the main redan, on the left of the Jackson road. He, however, made no attempt to storm the breach, to the disappointment of our brave soldiers, who, though for a moment stunned by the fearful shock they sustained, were instantly ready to meet the foe and once more teach him that he could not take our works by assault.
        The mine was a very heavy one. The entire left face, part of the right, and the entire terre-plein of the redan were blown up, leaving an immense deep chasm. Our interior works were materially injured. One sapper and 8 negroes, of the engineer department, occupied at countermining, were buried and lost, and the Third Louisiana lost 1 killed and 21 wounded and the Appeal Battery 4 wounded by the explosion. The loss of the Sixth Missouri by the mine I cannot state. It must have been serious.
        During July 2 and up to 8 a.m. on the 3d, the enemy's fire was kept up as usual, our troops suffering more than before from his mortar shelling. At 8 a.m. on the 3d, all firing ceased by the sending out of a flag of truce. This cessation of hostilities continued to the end of the siege, the next day.
        On July 4, at 10 a.m., in accordance with the terms of capitulation and orders received, my command stacked their arms in front of their lines, evacuated their trenches, and were marched to bivouac in the rear of our works, where they are now being paroled.
        On May 19, Col. Charles [H.] Herrick reported to me for artillery duty in my brigade. He was at once assigned as chief of the artillery on my line. Proceeding to his duties, he found himself at the Graveyard road at the time of the assault of that day. Gallantly joining in the fight, he fell, mortally wounded, dying a few days after.
        On May 21, Lieut. Charles A. Bruslé, aide-de-camp, received a painful wound in the shoulder by a Minie ball.
        On July 1, before the explosion of the mine, Lieutenant [P. J.] Blessing, assistant engineer, was painfully wounded by a sharpshooter. This officer had been unremitting in his labors night and day during the siege, often showing a gallantry and devotion worthy of reward.
        Casualties in the different regiments, battalions, and companies will appear in the list of names to accompany this report.
        The above is a brief history of the part taken by my brigade in the siege of Vicksburg, terminated by the capitulation of July 4, 1863. I will not cite here individual acts of bravery and of devotion. I will not pass encomiums on officers and soldiers by name. With few, very few exceptions, all my officers and soldiers have proven themselves worthy of the admiration of the army and of the country. Forty-eight days and nights passed in the trenches, exposed to the burning sun during the day, the chilly air of night; subject to a murderous storm of balls, shells, and war missiles of all kinds; cramped up in pits and holes not large enough to allow them to extend their limbs; laboring day and night; fed on reduced rations of the poorest kind of food, yet always cheerful--al-ways ready and eager that the foe should advance; calm, resolute, their comrades falling around them at every instant under a fire they were forbidden to return. Such are the claims my noble officers and soldiers have upon the admiration of their countrymen. The list of casualties sufficiently attests that my brigade occupied and held unflinchingly one of the most exposed portions of the defenses of Vicksburg. Many a gallant spirit was sacrificed; let their memory be cherished and their names be honored.

Recapitulation of Casualties.

Command Officers
Killed
Enlisted
Killed
Officers
Wounded
Enlisted
Wounded
3rd Louisiana 4 41 6 120
36th Mississippi 4 23 5 68
37th Mississippi 1 16 6 50
38th Mississippi 3 28 5 36
43rd Mississippi 1 20 --- 37
7th Mississippi Battalion 2 12 4 32
21st and 23rd [22nd] Louisiana 4 25 8 66
Appeal Battery 2 2 1 6
Emanuel's Battery 1 6 ---- 8
Ratliff's Battery ---- 3 1 13
Lowe's Battery ---- ---- ---- ----
Pointe Coupée Battery 1 3 ---- 5
Ridley's Battery ---- ---- ---- 2
Brigade Headquarters 1 ---- 1 ----
Total 24 179 37 43

        Total killed 203
        Total wounded. 480
        Aggregate killed and wounded 683

Respectfully submitted.
LOUIS HEBÉRT,
Brigadier-General.

NOTE.--The casualties may not be exactly correct, but are known to be nearly so.


HEADQUARTERS HÉBERT'S BRIGADE,
Camp near Demopolis, August 31, 1863.

R. R. HUTCHINSON,
Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of Mississippi and East Louisiana.

        SIR: In answer to your note of the 29th instant, received yesterday, I have the honor to transmit a list of ordnance left by me at Snyder's Mill when ordered thence to Vicksburg on May 17 last. It is impossible for me to give a list of ammunition and other stores left, for reasons given below. It is also impossible for me to state what ordnance and ordnance stores were lost at Snyder's, as will also appear by this communication. I will, however, state that I estimate that on average there were about 200 rounds of ammunition to each gun at Snyder's on the morning of May 17 before the movement for evacuation commenced. I quote as follows extracts from my report after the capitulation of Vicksburg, dated July 9:
        On May 17 last, I was in command at Snyder's Mill. On the same day, at 11 a.m., I received orders to prepare to evacuate the place, and to send into Vicksburg the commissary stores, and to have driven in all the cattle, hogs, and sheep that could be collected in the neighboring country. Having but a very small number of wagons and but a few mounted men, I, however, commenced carrying out my instructions as far as practicable. At 2.45 p.m. I received orders to send to Vicksburg all ordnance stores, and to prepare to spike and destroy the heavy guns. All remaining wagons were loaded with ordnance stores, and Col. Isaac W. Patton put to work to prepare the guns for spiking or destruction. Colonel Patton was the commander of my heavy artillery. At 5.30 p.m. I received the orders to march my command to Vicksburg, leaving two companies at Snyder's Mill, under an efficient officer, to keep up a show of occupation, and to spike or destroy the guns and destroy remaining stores when the enemy would be discovered approaching the position.

* * * * * * * * * *

        Having made all arrangements possible under existing circumstances with reference to the post of Snyder's Mill, I moved with my command at 7.30 p.m. by the Valley road to Vicksburg, where I reported myself at 2.30 o'clock on the morning of May 18. I was immediately ordered to the trenches.

* * * * * * * * * *

        Early in the day Col. Isaac W. Patton received orders directly from the lieutenant-general commanding to return to Snyder's Mill, for the purpose of disposing of the guns and stores left there. These orders relieved Lieutenant-Colonel [J. T.] Plattsmier of the duty I had assigned him, and I have, therefore, no report to make of what was really finally abandoned at Snyder's Mill.
        Colonel Patton, having received his orders directly from the lieutenant-general commanding, made me no report on his return to Vicksburg on May 19. I am not aware that he has made any report to department headquarters.
        On May 17, several wagon loads of ammunition were sent from Snyder's Mill to Vicksburg. The amount sent in was known by my chief of ordnance, but this officer was, unfortunately, killed before he had sent in his report. I would estimate that at least one-half of the powder and cartridges, and perhaps one-half of the fixed ammunition, were brought into Vicksburg. I have reason to believe that the two 30-pounder Parrotts, one 24-pounder smooth-bore, the Whitworth gun, and the two 12-pounder howitzers (field brass pieces), given in the list, were brought into Vicksburg by Colonel Patton on May 18 or 19. I know of no ordnance or ordnance stores lost of my command during the siege of Vicksburg, and, therefore, have no statement to make for that period of time.

I remain, respectfully, your obedient servant,
LOUIS HÉBERT,
Brigadier-General.

P. S.--It may be proper to state that at the surrender, on July 4, I stacked on my line, or left in the trenches, about 2,075 serviceable small-arms and five pieces of serviceable light artillery. One-fourth of the enlisted men had two pieces small-arms--one musket and one rifle. All other artillery was at the time unserviceable.

List of ordnance left at Snyder's Mill, May 17, 1863.

10-inch columbiads 2
8-inch columbiads 3
42-pounder smooth-bore 1
32-pounder rifles (banded) 2
32-pounder rifles (not banded) 2
32-pounder smooth-bore 1
32-pounder Navy 2
30-pounder Parrotts 2
24-pounder rifle 1
24-pounder smooth-bore 1
Whitworth gun 1
12-pounder howitzers, without caissons (field brass pieces) 2
Total number of guns 20

Respectfully,
JOHN G. KELLY,
Assistant Inspector-General.

Respectfully submitted.
LOUIS HEBÉRT,
Brigadier-General.

AUGUST 31, 1863.

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