Reports of Maj. Leman W. Bradley, Sixty-fourth New York Infantry.
Gettysburg Campaign
O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43]

PLEASANT VALLEY, MD., July 17, 1863.

Lieut. CHARLES P. HATCH,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Brooke' s Brigade.

       SIR: I have the honor to report the part taken by the Sixty-fourth Regiment New York Volunteers at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2 and 3.
       The regiment went into the engagement on July 2 under the command of Col. Daniel O. Bingham, numbering 185 enlisted men carrying rifles, and 19 commissioned officers.
       The regiment was deployed in line faced by the rear rank on the right of the Fifty-third Pennsylvania Regiment, the left of the Second Delaware Regiment resting on our right. The regiment advanced with the brigade rapidly and steadily under a sharp fire from the enemy, whom we drove before us, killing, wounding, and taking many prisoners.
       Our loss on the 2d was:

Officers and Men Killed Wounded Missing Total
Commissioned Officers 4 7 --- 11
Enlisted Men 11 54 18 83
Total 15 61 18 94

       On the morning of the 3d, the Sixty-fourth was in line on the left of the brigade, and mustered for action 1 field officer, 5 captains, 6 lieutenants, and 85 enlisted men with rifles.
       Colonel Bingham being wounded and at division hospital, the command of the regiment devolved upon Major Bradley. Breastworks were built to our front, which proved a defense against the heavy cannonading received from the enemy on that day.
       Our only loss this day was 1 man wounded on picket, under the command of Capt. W. W. Wait.
       I am happy to say, as far as came to my knowledge, every officer and enlisted man did his duty in such a manner as to honor himself, his regiment, his brigade, and his country.
       On the 4th, we buried our dead and held short religious services, conducted by the chaplain of the One hundred and forty-fifth Pennsylvania Regiment.
       On Sunday morning, the 5th, we had an inspection of arms. At 4 p.m. the regiment marched with its brigade in the direction of Frederick City, Md.

Most respectfully, yours,
L. W. BRADLEY,
Major, Comdg. Sixty-fourth New York Volunteers.


NEAR KELLY'S FORD, VA., August 15, 1863.

Lieut. CHARLES P. HATCH,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Brooke's Brigade.

       SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the proceedings of the Sixty-fourth New York Volunteers from June 28 till the time of going into camp near Warrenton:
       Tuesday, June 28, the regiment, under the command of Col. D. G. Bingham, marched with the brigade at 6 a.m. from Barnesville, Md. After a march of 12 miles, bivouacked on the banks of the Monocacy, 3 miles from Frederick City.
       On the 29th, we were ordered to be in readiness to move at 6 a.m., at which time the regiment marched with the brigade toward Union-town, at which place we arrived in the evening, after a march of over 30 miles.
       On the 30th, we remained at Uniontown, and the regiment was mustered for pay.
       July 1, marched from Uniontown, passing through Taneytown, beyond which we made a halt, and were making arrangements to encamp when we were ordered to march.
       At evening we halted about 3 miles from Gettysburg, and were ordered to build breastworks. Before the works were finished, we were ordered to rest.
       At 2. 30 a.m., July 2, we were ordered to pack up quietly and cook coffee. At 4.10 a.m. we moved about 1 mile to the front, and at 5.45 a.m. halted in a wood. At 6.10 a.m. we marched with the brigade out of the wood across the Taneytown road. At 7 a.m. were formed with the brigade in line, by brigade in mass, fronting west, in a position a half mile southwest of Cemetery Hill. At 5.15 p.m. we moved in mass by brigade nearly a mile to the left. The regiment was deployed into line, faced by the rear rank, on the right of the Fifty-third Pennsylvania Regiment, the left of the Second Delaware resting on our right. The regiment advanced with the brigade rapidly and steadily under a sharp fire from the enemy, whom we drove before us, killing, wounding, and taking many prisoners.
       The regiment went into the engagement numbering 202 enlisted men carrying rifles, 2 field, 1 staff, and 16 line officers. Our loss this day was as follows:

Officers and Men Killed Wounded Missing Total
Commissioned Officers 4 7 --- 11
Enlisted Men 11 54 18 83
Total 15 61 18 94

       The service lost in the killed the brave Capt. Henry V. Fuller, who had distinguished himself for gallantly in every action in which the regiment had been engaged. He was so well known in his brigade and division as to make it unnecessary for me to say anything in his praise.
       Capt. A. H. Lewis and Lieutenants Babcock and Thurber, who fell at the same time, were highly esteemed as officers and gentlemen. They died facing the foe.
       On the morning of the 3d, the Sixty-fourth was in line on the left of the brigade, and mustered for action 1 field officer, 5 captains, 6 lieutenants, and 85 enlisted men with rifles.
       Colonel Bingham being wounded and at the division hospital, the command of the regiment devolved upon Major Bradley. Breastworks were built to our front, which proved a protection against the heavy cannonading from the enemy on that day.
       Our loss on the 3d was 1 man, wounded on picket, under the command of Capt. W. W. Wait.
       I am happy to say, so far as came to my knowledge, that during the two days' engagement every officer and enlisted man did his duty in such a manner as to honor himself, his regiment, his brigade, and his country.
       On the 4th we buried our dead and held short religious services, conducted by Chaplain John H. W. Stuckenberg, of the One hundred and forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers. Afterward I sent out a detail to collect arms and accouterments on the battle-field.
       On Sunday morning, the 5th, I had an inspection of arms. At 4 p.m. marched with brigade in the direction of Frederick City; bivouacked at 8 p.m. at Two Taverns.
       During the 6th, we remained in bivouac.
       On the 7th, marched 9 miles to near Taneytown; received rations and bivouacked.
       On the 8th, marched at 5 a.m. Soon after moving, a hard rain came on, making the roads very muddy. This was a hard day's march for the men; bivouacked for the night near Frederick City. July 9, marched at 5 a.m., Sixty-fourth leading the brigade; bivouacked near [Crampton's Gap], Md. On the 10th, moved at 5 a.m.; crossed Antietam River at Keedysville; marched 3 miles, and formed a line of battle; at night bivouacked. On the 11th, reveille at 4 a.m.; marched at 6 a.m.; formed line of battle at 11 a.m. at Lapham's [Jones'] Cross-Roads; sent picket detail to brigade headquarters of 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, and 43 enlisted men.
       Remained here until the afternoon of the 12th, when we advanced with the brigade to a wood, where we formed line of battle on the crest of a rocky ledge, Sixty-fourth on the right. At dark, commenced throwing up intrenchments. On the 13th, we finished our breastworks.
       On the 14th, at 6 a.m., the brigade advanced toward Falling Waters. The Sixty-fourth were deployed as skirmishers, the left connecting with the right of the Fifth New Hampshire. We moved as skirmishers in this position several miles, when I was ordered to Colonel Brooke, who ordered me to march as support to line of skirmishers on the left of Lieutenant-Colonel Chapman, of the Fifty-seventh New York. I was afterward ordered to take charge of 164 enlisted men and 2 commissioned officers, taken prisoners by the skirmishers of the Fourth Brigade. The provost-marshal coming up, relieved me, when I reported to the brigade, which had halted in a ravine, where we bivouacked for the night.
       On the 15th, marched at 5 a.m., Sixty-fourth leading the brigade. Marched to nearly opposite Harper's Ferry, when we bivouacked by the side of the canal for the night.
       On the 16th, marched at 9 a.m. to Pleasant Valley, and bivouacked, and issued clothing to the men.
       On the 17th, remained at Pleasant Valley. The men, obeying the injunction of the brigade commander, bathed freely.
       On the 18th, marched at 6 a.m. Crossed the Potomac on pontoon bridge at Harper's Ferry. Marched south 7 miles, and bivouacked.
       At 11 a.m. on the 19th, marched 6 miles farther south, and bivouacked.
       On the 20th, marched at 8.30 a.m.; bivouacked near Bloomfield. On the 21st, did not move.
       Wednesday, July 22, marched at 2 p.m. and halted toward evening with the brigade, holding Ashby's Gap.
       On the 23d, at 2 p.m., left Ashby's Gap and marched about 8 miles toward Manassas Gap, when we halted at dusk and issued rations. Heard firing in the direction of Manassas Gap. Were soon ordered to pack up, and were very soon on our way with the brigade to Manassas Gap, which we entered and passed through, bivouacking at 1 a.m. of the 24th.
       At 1 p.m. marched back through the gap, and bivouacked near Martin's [Markham] Station at 5 p.m.
       On the 25th, moved at 5 a.m.; bivouacked near White Plains.
       Sunday, 26th, marched at 5 a.m. Passed through White Plains and Warrenton.
       At 5 p.m. halted in a large field about 2 tories from Warrenton Junction. Bivouacked, and remained till the afternoon of the 30th, when we moved with the brigade to the vicinity of our present camping place.
       Before bringing this report to a close, I would mention Asst. Surg. Charles T. Kelsey as deserving worthy and especial notice in the fight at Gettysburg as at Chancellorsville. He went into battle with his regiment, encouraging the men by words and actions; was with us when we deployed into line, and did not halt until he had wounded men to attend to.
       We had 16 commissioned officers and 126 enlisted men for duty in the field. A detail of officers and men has been sent to the State of New York for drafted men. It is hoped our numbers will soon be increased.
       Both officers and men are in good spirits, having the utmost confidence in and great attachment for Col. John R. Brooke, their brigade commander. They will cheerfully obey any order he may give, or, as heretofore, follow where he leads.

I am, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant,
L. W. BRADLEY,
Major, Commanding Regiment.

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