Reports of Brig. Gen. John S. Bowen, C. S. Army, commanding Division.
MAY 19-JULY 4, 1863.--The Siege of Vicksburg, Miss.
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/2 [S# 37]

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
Vicksburg, May 28, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        SIR: I have the honor to state that, in accordance with orders from the lieutenant-general commanding, I ordered two of Colonel Cockrell's regiments (the First and Fifth Missouri) to relieve General Green, and three to re-enforce General Forney. One of these regiments (the Sixth) was assigned to a position in the trenches, which had become intolerable on account of dead animals near by and the filth of the troops who formerly occupied it. I sent a letter of remonstrance to General Forney, asking that the troops who formerly occupied the position be made to police it, which he declined. Is it not sufficient that when a general finds a weak point or enfiladed trench that he withdraws his regiment and calls for one of mine to occupy it, without compelling my men to clean up the filth they leave behind them

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. S. BOWEN,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.


VICKSBURG, June 5, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to inclose herewith General Green's report from scouts of his brigade.
        I have also the honor to report that the two regiments who went to General Cumming's support found that he had nearly two regiments in reserve already. The distance to General Cumming's from Cockrell's position is about I mile, requiring about twenty minutes to reach him.

Respectfully,
JNO. S. BOWEN,
Brigadier-General.


HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
Vicksburg, June 6, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: General Green reports no change on his front. The enemy endeavored to dig a trench nearer our lines, but were prevented by sharpshooters. He lost 3 killed and 9 wounded in the last twenty-four hours. He reports that he is badly in want of some picks.
        Please inform me if the necessity still exists of retaining Colonel Cockrell's two regiments in rear of General Cumming.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. S. BOWEN,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.


HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
Vicksburg, June 26, 1863.

Major MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        SIR: The inclosed note explains itself. No report has been forwarded from this division, because none could be obtained from the First Brigade. We are in a different position from any other command here. Our men are constantly moving from place to place, and some regiments are now on the extreme right, some in the center, and several engaged yesterday and last night.
        Under these circumstances it was impossible to obtain a morning report. I send that of the Second Brigade, forwarded yesterday. I will send the other when I can get it. It can hardly be expected from troops fighting in the breach.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JNO. S. BOWEN,
Major-General, Commanding Division.


VICKSBURG, June 26, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: I have the honor to report that the First and Second Missouri Regiments are on the Warrenton road, in rear of Barton's brigade' the Fifth and Sixth at the breach on the Jackson road, and the Third with Shoup at the redan on the Graveyard road.
        Colonel [E.] Erwin, of the Sixth, was killed last night defending the breach. Cockrell is now present at that point, by my order, as I feared Erwin's loss (one of our bravest officers) might dispirit his men.

Respectfully,
JNO. S. BOWEN,
Major-General.


VICKSBURG, MISS., June 27, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMINGER.

        MAJOR: The sad duty devolves upon me of announcing the death of Brig. Gen. Martin E. Green, commanding the Second Brigade of this division.
        General Green was shot through the head while examining the position of the enemy in front of his trenches at about 9.30 this morning. Devoted to our cause, without fear or reproach, his loss will be deeply felt by his entire command.

Very respectfully,
JNO. S. BOWEN,
Major-general.


VICKSBURG, MISS., July 2, 1863.

Maj. R. W. MEMMINGER,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        MAJOR: Our position on the Jackson road is fast becoming more dangerous. The enemy have a Cohorn mortar and our exact range. They fire shell with heavy bursting charges, and our men are killed and wounded with fearful rapidity. Lieutenant-Colonel Senteny, commanding Cockrell's regiment, was killed this morning. No better or braver field officer is or ever has been in our army. Many subalterns, conspicuous for their gallantry, have also been killed or wounded.
        I would urge that every howitzer that can be brought to the vicinity be placed in position, and fired at its greatest elevation with quarter charges, to render the ground in the rear and vicinity of their sap as untenable as possible. No time is to be lost.

Respectfully,
JNO. S. BOWEN,
Major-General.

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