Reports of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, U.S. Army,
commanding Army of the Potomac, of operations July 4-August 3,
and correspondence with the authorities in Washington, &c.
O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 4, 1863--7 a.m.
(Received 7.20 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

This morning the enemy has withdrawn his pickets from the positions of yesterday. My own pickets are moving out to ascertain the nature and extent of the enemy's movement. My information is not sufficient for me to decide its character yet--whether a retreat or maneuver for other purposes.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


JULY 4, 1863--12 noon.
(Received July 5, 3.50 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
Washington:

        The position of affairs is not materially changed from my last dispatch, 7 a.m. The enemy apparently has thrown back his left, and placed guns and troops in position in rear of Gettysburg, which we now hold. The enemy has abandoned large numbers of his killed and wounded on the field. I shall require some time to get up supplies, ammunition, &c., rest the army, worn out by long marches and three days' hard fighting. I shall probably be able to give you a return of our captures and losses before night, and return of the enemy's killed and wounded in our hands.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


JULY 4, 1863.

Major ECKERT:

        General Meade desires to know under whose orders and authority the telegraph operators possessing the cipher are appointed and controlled. The operator, Mr. Caldwell, at these headquarters presumes to act in an independent manner, and has left headquarters for Westminster, selecting his own location, without authority or permission. The commanding general is unable to send dispatches from these headquarters in cipher in consequence thereof, or to understand those he receives.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,
Major-General, and Chief of Staff.


JULY 4--10 p.m. (Received July 6, 6.10 a.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

        No change of affairs since dispatch of 12 noon.
        I make a reconnaissance to-morrow, to ascertain what the intention of the enemy is.
        My cavalry are now moving toward the South Mountain Pass, and, should the enemy retreat, I shall pursue him on his flanks.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.

[P. S.]--A proposition made by General Lee, under flag of truce, to exchange prisoners, was declined by me.


HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 5, 1863--8.30 a.m.
(Received 8.40 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

        The enemy retired, under cover of the night and heavy rain, in the direction of Fairfield and Cashtown. All my available cavalry are in pursuit, on the enemy's left and rear. My movement will be made at once on his flank, via Middletown and South Mountain Pass. I cannot give you the details of our captures in prisoners, colors, and arms. Upward of twenty battle-flags will be turned in from one corps. I cannot delay to pick up the débris of the battle-field, and request that all those arrangements may be made by the departments. My wounded, with those of the enemy in our hands, will be left at Gettysburg. After burying our own, I am compelled to employ citizens to bury the enemy's dead. My headquarters will be to-night at Creagerstown. Communication received from General [W. F.] Smith, in command of 3,000 men, on the march from Carlisle toward Cashtown.
        Field return last evening gives me about 55,000 effective in the ranks, exclusive of cavalry, baggage guards, ambulances, attendants, &c. Every available re-enforcement is required, and should be sent to Frederick without delay.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 5, 1863--6 p.m.
(Received 11.30 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        I send copies of all my dispatches since yesterday morning. My army is all in motion. I shall be at Frederick to-morrow night. I desire the forces mentioned in your dispatch to Major-General French to be thrown to Harper's Ferry by rail as soon as possible. I shall so instruct Major-General French. It is of importance to get possession of South Mountain passes and Maryland Heights.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 5, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        Your movements are perfectly satisfactory. Your call for reinforcements to Frederick has been anticipated. Call to you all of Couch's force.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 5, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        You will assume the general command of such of General Couch's forces as are operating in the field, and direct their movements as you may deem best. It seems to me that they should connect with your right flank. I think that the troops sent here from Harper's Ferry and a part of the forces now in Baltimore could join General French, and be available for your operations. Four small regiments from North Carolina have reached Baltimore. I am awaiting an answer from my dispatch, sent through General French this morning, in regard to re-enforcing him as above indicated. So long as your movements cover Baltimore and Washington from Lee's main army, they are in no danger from any force the enemy may detach for a raid. We have heard nothing from you since yesterday morning, and are anxious to learn more of the results of your brilliant fighting.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Gettysburg, July 6, 1863--2 p.m.
(Received 9.20 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Yesterday I sent General Sedgwick with the Sixth Corps in pursuit of the enemy toward Fairfield, and a brigade of cavalry toward Cashtown. General Sedgwick's report indicating a large force of the enemy in the mountains, I deemed it prudent to suspend the movement to Middletown until I could be certain the enemy were evacuating the Cumberland Valley. I find great difficulty in getting reliable information, but from all I can learn I have reason to believe the enemy is retreating, very much crippled, and hampered with his trains.
        General Sedgwick reported that the gap at Fairfield was very formidable, and would enable a small force to hold my column in check for a long time. I have accordingly resumed the movement to Middletown, and I expect by to-morrow night to assemble the army in that vicinity. Supplies will be then provided, and as soon as possible I will cross South Mountain, and proceed in search of the enemy.
        Your dispatch requiring me to assume the general command of the forces in the field under General Couch has been received. I know nothing of the position or strength of his command, excepting the advance under General Smith, which I have ordered here, and which I desire should furnish a necessary force to guard this place while the enemy is in the vicinity. A brigade of infantry and one of cavalry, with two batteries, will be left to watch the enemy at Fairfield, and follow them whenever they evacuate the gap. I shall send general instructions to General Couch to move down the Cumberland Valley as far as the enemy evacuates it, and keep up communications with me; but from all the information I can obtain, I do not rely on any active co-operation in battle with this force. If I can get the Army of the Potomac in hand in the Valley, and the enemy have not crossed the river, I shall give him battle, trusting, should misfortune overtake me, that a sufficient number of my force, in connection with what you have in Washington, would reach that place so as to render it secure.
        General Trimble, of the Confederate army, was today found wounded just outside of Gettysburg. General [J. L.] Kemper was found mortally wounded on the road to Fairfield, and a large number of wounded, estimated as several thousand. Generals Heth. Wade Hampton, Jenkins, and Pender are reported wounded. The losses of the enemy were no doubt very great, and he must be proportionately crippled.
        My headquarters will be here to-night, and to-morrow I expect to be at Frederick. My cavalry have been attacking the enemy on both flanks, inflicting as much injury as possible.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 6, 1863--8 p.m. (Received July 7, 1.30 a.m.)

General HALLECK:

        I shall be very glad to have the four regiments from North Carolina, now at Baltimore, which you propose to add to General French's command. They should be put in marching order, with shelter tents.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 6, 1863.

Major-General MEADE and Major-General FRENCH,
Frederick, Md.:

        Fifteen hundred cavalry left here this forenoon on Rockville and Frederick turnpike. They are detachments from the Army of the Potomac, remounted. You can send orders to them on the road to move as you deem best. Elliott's command, with two new batteries, left by railroad this morning.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 6, 1863-12.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE and Major-General FRENCH:

        It is just reported here that the bridge at Harper's Ferry was left intact when General French's command abandoned that place. If so, it gives Lee a good crossing, unless it be occupied by us in strong force. No time should be lost in throwing troops on to Maryland Heights.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Frederick, July 7, 1863--3.10 p.m.
(Received 4.45 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

        General Buford reports that he attacked Williamsport yesterday, but found it guarded by a large force of infantry and artillery. Heavy forces were coming into Williamsport all night. French having destroyed their bridges, and the river being unfordable, they are crossing in country flat-boats--a slow operation. My army will be assembling today and to-morrow at Middletown. I will immediately move on Williamsport. Should the enemy succeed in crossing the river before I can reach him, I should like to have your views of subsequent operations--whether to follow up the army in the Valley, or cross below and nearer Washington.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-general.

4 P.M.

[P.S.]--An officer of the cavalry from the front reports the enemy's army as occupying Hagerstown and Williamsport, and guarding their artillery and trains, which they cannot cross. So soon as my command is supplied and their trains up, I shall move.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 7, 1863--3 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE G. MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        It gives me great pleasure to inform you that you have been appointed a brigadier-general in the Regular Army, to rank from July 3, the date of your brilliant victory at Gettysburg.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


FREDERICK, MD., July 7, 1863--4 p.m.
(Received 5 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:`
General-in-Chief:

        I have received your dispatch announcing my appointment as brigadier-general in the Regular Army.
        Please convey to the President my grateful thanks for this honor, and receive for yourself my thanks for the kind manner you have conveyed the notification.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


FREDERICK, MD., July 7, 1863--4 p.m.
(Received 5.25 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Maryland Heights are at present occupied by Kenly's brigade, 1,700 men. Three thousand additional men and two batteries of artillery left here this morning for that place. No indications of the enemy this side of Williamsport and Hagerstown.
        The bridge at Harper's Ferry was rendered impassable at both sides by General French.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 7, 1863--8.45 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Frederick, Md.:

        You have given the enemy a stunning blow at Gettysburg. Follow it up, and give him another before he can reach the Potomac. When he crosses, circumstances will determine whether it will be best to pursue him by the Shenandoah Valley or this side of Blue Ridge. There is strong evidence that he is short of artillery ammunition, and, if vigorously pressed, he must suffer.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 7, 1863.

Major-General MEADE or Major-General FRENCH,
Frederick, Md.:

        What force has been sent to Maryland Heights, and how many have reached there? It seems to me, at the present, to be a most important point, and should be held with forces sufficient to prevent its occupation by the enemy. Should his crossing above be impossible, he will probably attempt to take and hold that position until he can make the passage.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 7, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Frederick, Md.:

        I have seen your dispatch to General Couch of 4.40 p.m. You are perfectly right. Push forward, and fight Lee before he can cross the Potomac.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 7, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        I have received from the President the following note, which I respectfully communicate:

Major-General HALLECK:

        We have certain information that Vicksburg surrendered to General Grant on the 4th of July. Now, if General Meade can complete his work, so gloriously prosecuted thus far, by the literal or substantial destruction of Lee's army, the rebellion will be over.

Yours, truly,
A. LINCOLN.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 8, 1863--10.30 a.m.
(Received 10.45 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

        I have ordered General Naglee, with the eight regiments of his command, to Harper's Ferry, to re-enforce General Kenly and to assume command. This will make a force of between 6,000 and 7,000 men. He is directed to hold his command in readiness to move forward to my support, if required. I have also sent a bridge train there, with an engineer party, the bridge to be thrown over only when any command, cavalry or other, should arrive there to cross. I leave the Seventh New York Regiment and a battery of six pieces to defend this depot against raids.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 8, 1863--2 p.m. (Received 2.55 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief :

        General Couch learns from scouts that the train at Williamsport is crossing very slowly. So long as the river is unfordable, the enemy cannot cross. My cavalry report that they had a fight near Funkstown, through which they drove the enemy to Hagerstown, where a large infantry force was seen. From all I can gather, the enemy extends from Hagerstown to Williamsport, covering the march of their train. Their cavalry and infantry pickets are advanced to the Hagerstown and Sharpsburg pike, on the general line of the Antietam. We hold Boonsborough, and our pickets, 4 miles in front, toward Hagerstown, are in contact with the enemy's pickets. My army is assembling slowly. The rains of yesterday and last night have made all roads but pikes almost impassable. Artillery and wagons are stalled; it will take time to collect them together. A large portion of the men are barefooted. Shoes will arrive at Frederick to-day, and will be issued as soon as possible. The spirit of the army is high; the men are ready and willing to make every exertion to push forward. The very first moment I can get the different commands, the artillery and cavalry, properly supplied and in hand, I will move forward. Be assured I most earnestly desire to try the fortunes of war with the enemy on this side of the river, hoping through Providence and the bravery of my men to settle the question, but I should do wrong not to frankly tell you of the difficulties encountered. I expect to find the enemy in a strong position, well covered with artillery, and I do not desire to imitate his example at Gettysburg, and assault a position where the chances were so greatly against success. I wish in advance to moderate the expectations of those who, in ignorance of the difficulties to be encountered, may expect too much. All that I can do under the circumstances I pledge this army to do.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 8, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Frederick, Md.:

        There is reliable information that the enemy is crossing at Williamsport. The opportunity to attack his divided forces should not be lost. The President is urgent and anxious that your army should move against him by forced marches.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 8, 1863--3 p.m.
(Received 3.20 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        My information as to the crossing of the enemy does not agree with that just received in your dispatch. His whole force is in position between Funkstown and Williamsport. I have just received information that he has driven my cavalry force in front of Boons-borough. My army is and has been making forced marches, short of rations, and barefooted. One corps marched yesterday and last night over 30 miles. I take occasion to repeat that I will use my utmost efforts to push forward this army.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 8, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac :

        Do not understand me as expressing any dissatisfaction; on the contrary, your army has done most nobly. I only wish to give you opinions formed from information received here. It is telegraphed from near Harper's Ferry that the enemy have been crossing for the last two days. It is also reported that they have a bridge across. If Lee's army is so divided by the river, the importance of attacking the part on this side is incalculable. Such an opportunity may never occur again. If, on the contrary, he has massed his whole force on the Antietam, time must be taken to also concentrate your forces. Your opportunities for information are better than mine. General Kelley was ordered some days ago to concentrate at Hancock and attack the enemy's right. General Brooks is also moving from Pittsburgh to re-enforce Kelley. All troops arriving from New York and Fort Monroe are sent directly to Harper's Ferry, unless you order differently. You will have forces sufficient to render your victory certain. My only fear now is that the enemy may escape by crossing the river.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 8, 1863.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS,
Adjutant-General, Washington:

        GENERAL: I have the honor herewith to transmit thirty-one battle-flags, captured from the enemy in the recent battle at Gettysburg. Several other flags were captured on that occasion, but those sent embrace all thus far sent in by corps commanders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.

General Barksdale's sword was given in my charge to bring with the above flags.

ED. SCHRIVER.


WASHINGTON, July 9, 1863--9.40 a.m.

Major-General MEADE:

        If no arrangement was made between you and General Lee for the exchange and parole of prisoners of war, by designating places of delivery, as provided for in seventh article of cartel, no parole given by the troops of either army is valid. Please answer if any such agreement was made.

H. W. HALLECK.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Middletown, July 9, 1863--11 a.m.
(Received 12.10 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        The army is moving in three columns, the right column having in it three corps. The line occupied to-day with the advance will be on the other side of the mountains, from Boonsborough to Rohrersville. Two corps will march without their artillery, the animals being completely exhausted, many falling on the road. The enemy's infantry were driven back yesterday evening from Boonsborough, or, rather, they retired on being pressed toward Hagerstown. I am still under the impression that Lee's whole army is between Hagerstown and Williamsport, with an advance at Middleburg, on the road to Green-castle, observing Couch. The state of the river and the difficulty of crossing has rendered it imperative on him to have his army, artillery, and trains ready to receive my attack. I propose to move on a line from Boonsborough toward the center of the line from Hagerstown to Williamsport, my left flank looking to the river and my right toward the mountains, keeping the road to Frederick in my rear and center. I shall try to keep as concentrated as the roads by which I can move will admit, so that, should the enemy attack, I can move to meet him, and, if he assumes the defensive, I can deploy as I think proper. I transmit a copy of dispatch, sent to General Smith, at Waynesborough. One of like tenor was sent to General Couch. The operations of both those officers should be made to conform to mine. They can readily ascertain my progress from scouts and by the movements of the enemy, and, if the forces under them are of any practical value, they could join my right flank and assist in the attack. My cavalry will be pushed to-day well to the front, on the right and left, and I hope will collect information. It is with the greatest difficulty that I can obtain any reliable intelligence of the enemy. I send a dispatch, received this morning from General Neill, in command of a brigade of infantry and cavalry, who followed the retreat of the enemy through Fairfield, and effected a junction with General Smith at Waynesborough. A copy of my dispatch to General Smith is also sent you. When I spoke of two corps having to leave their batteries behind, I should have stated that they remained at Frederick to get new horses and shoe the others, and that they will rejoin their corps this p.m. The object of the remark was to show the delay. I think the decisive battle of the war will be fought in a few days. In view of its momentous consequences, I desire to adopt such measures as in my judgment will tend to insure success, even though these may be deemed tardy.

GEO. G. MEADE.

11.30 A.M.

[P.S.]--A deserter has just been brought within our lines who reports the enemy's army all between Hagerstown and Williamsport; that they have brought up a bridge from Winchester, which is now thrown across at Williamsport; that they are using this bridge, not to cross their forces, but to bring over supplies; that the men are in fine spirits, and the talk among them is they must try it again. This deserter says he belongs to the artillery of Stuart's command. I send the information for what it is worth.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. LIGHT DIV., ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July
9, 1863.

General S. WILLIAMS:

        SIR: Baldy [W. F.] Smith is here with his command. Colonel [J. I.] Gregg, with brigade of cavalry, who leaves for Boonsborough to-night, will send this.
        A scout brings information that Lee has one corps intrenched on the Williamsport pike from Hagerstown; another on Boonsborough pike; and Early is said to be up toward Middleburg (quien sabe?), between Newcastle [Greencastle?] and Hagerstown. The news of the capture of Vicksburg is confirmed. Have sent a cavalry reconnaissance toward Hagerstown this morning; it has not returned.
        Since writing the above, have felt the enemy's pickets with a regiment of cavalry at a bridge 4 or 5 miles from Hagerstown. They are stubborn. We drove them away, but they returned as we retired. General Smith is in with his mixed command. Am delighted to have the benefit of his counsel and advice. We are all right, but watch Early's division on my right toward Middleburg.

THOS. H. NEILL,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 9, 1863--5.20 p.m.
(Received 7.10 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        I transmit herewith a copy of instructions this moment sent to General Naglee at Harper's Ferry.

Very respectfully,
GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 9, 1863--5.20 p. m

Brigadier-General NAGLEE,
Commanding Harper's Ferry:

        Organize the re-enforcements in brigades as fast as they arrive, and send them, through Rohrersville, to join the left of the army, seeing that they have haversacks and three days' rations. First secure a garrison of 3,000 or 4,000 men to garrison Maryland Heights against a coup de main.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,
Chief of Staff.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 9, 1863-3 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE G. MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        The evidence that Lee's army will fight north of the Potomac seems reliable. In that case you will want all your forces in hand. Kelley is collecting at Hancock. I have directed him to push forward, so as to take part in the coming battle. Brooks' militia refused to cross the Pennsylvania line. Everything I can get here will be pushed on to Harper's Ferry, from which place you can call them in to your left. Do not be influenced by any dispatch from here against your own judgment. Regard them as suggestions only. Our information here is not always correct. Take any horses or supplies you can find in the country. They can be settled for afterward. Would it not be well to fortify the Hagerstown Gap, through the South Mountain, as a part of the support?

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 9, 1863-4.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE:
Army of the Potomac:

        Two full regiments and two complete batteries are ordered to leave here to-night. Three brigades are on their way, and maybe expected to-morrow or the day after. They will be sent to Harper's Ferry, unless you wish otherwise. I shall do everything in my power to re-enforce you. I fully appreciate the importance of the coming battle.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 10, 1863--9 a.m.
(Received 9.45 a.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Means of transportation and supplies required by the re-enforcements for this army being at Frederick, it would facilitate their junction with the army if the re-enforcements were sent to Frederick instead of Harper's Ferry.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 10, 1863--11.20 a.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        You can stop at Frederick the re-enforcements ordered to Harper's Ferry. Those ordered hereafter will be directed to Frederick, at your request. I fear the three additional brigades may not reach here before to-morrow night.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 10, 1863--1 p.m.
(Received 3.10 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        The information received to-day indicates that the enemy occupy positions extending from the Potomac, near Falling Waters, through Downsville to Funkstown, and to the northeast of Hagerstown, Ewell's corps being to the northeast of Hagerstown, Longstreet at Funkstown, and A. P. Hill on their right. These positions they are said to be intrenching. I am advancing on a line perpendicular to the line from Hagerstown to Williamsport, and the army will this evening occupy a position extending from the Boonsborough and Hagerstown road, at a point 1 mile beyond Beaver Creek, to Bakersville, near the Potomac. Our cavalry advanced this morning, drove in the enemy's cavalry on the Boonsborough pike to within a mile of Funkstown, when the enemy displayed a large force, and opened a fire from heavy guns, 20-pounders. I shall advance cautiously on the same line to-morrow until I can develop more fully the enemy's force and position, upon which my future operations will depend.
        General Smith is still at Waynesborough. A dispatch was received from him at that place this morning. Instructions similar to those of yesterday were sent to him.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D. C.,
July 10, 1863--9 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        I think it will be best for you to postpone a general battle till you can concentrate all your forces and get up your reserves and re-enforcements. I will push on the troops as fast as they arrive. It would be well to have staff officers at the Monocacy, to direct the troops arriving where to go, and to see that they are properly fitted out. They should join you by forced marches. Beware of partial combats. Bring up and hurl upon the enemy all your forces, good and bad.

H. W. HALLECK.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 10, 1863.

The ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE ARMY,
Washington:

        SIR: I have the honor herewith to transmit five additional battle-flags captured from the enemy by the Second Army Corps in the recent engagement at Gettysburg. I also send a battle-flag captured at Chancellorsville, which has been sent in here.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Near Mountain House, July 10, 1863.
(Received 2.55 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

        In consequence of the very efficient service and the material aid rendered to me by the cavalry during my recent operations, I would esteem it a personal favor if the President would assign Major-General Pleasonton to the command of the Cavalry Corps, the position I found him in when I assumed command.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 11, 1863--12 m.

Major-General MEADE, Army of the Potomac:

        Your telegram in relation to General Pleasonton has been shown to the Secretary of War. There is no intention to supersede him in command of the cavalry. General Stoneman remains here. There is, however, an objection to any formal order at present. The three brigades are arriving. Assign them and their officers as you may deem best, without regard to present or former organizations.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Antietam Creek, July 11, 1863--4 p.m.
(Received 5.30 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        The line of this army was advanced cautiously this morning in the direction stated in yesterday's dispatch, and at this time its right rests on the road from Smoketown to Funkstown, about 2 miles from the latter, the line crossing the Antietam, passing through Jones' Cross-Roads, the left being near Marsh Run. Strong reconnaissances of infantry are being pushed out toward Funkstown, on the left bank of the Antietam, toward the same point on the right bank, and on the road from Sharpsburg to Funkstown. At the same time, cavalry force is pushing out on the left, on the Boonsborough and Williamsport road, and on the right toward Hagerstown from Chewsville and Leitersburg. The cavalry on the Chewsville road advanced without opposition to within a short distance, about 1 miles, of Hagerstown. The cavalry in the direction of Leitersburg and that advancing toward Williamsport have not yet been heard from. Everything indicates that the enemy is massing between Hagerstown and Williamsport, and from various sources it is stated they are intrenching. From the representations of General Spinola that the nine months' men of his command could not be relied upon, as their time had nearly expired, and my own experience of troops under such circumstances, I have directed the regiments of his brigade to be posted in the rear. Troops of this character can be of little service unless they are pledged to serve beyond their terms of enlistment; and the supplies they consume and the space they occupy on the lines of communication can be illy spared; besides, their presence may have an injurious effect upon other troops. I do not, therefore, desire to be re-enforced by such troops unless they have pledged themselves to remain beyond their terms of service and until I can dispense with their services.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 11, 1863--9 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        The nine months' men told me that they were willing to serve through this crisis under any one but General Spinola, but would not serve under him, as they regarded him as worthless. You are authorized to relieve him and send him away.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 12, 1863--4.30 p.m.
(Received 8 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Upon advancing my right flank across the Antietam this morning, the enemy abandoned Funkstown and Hagerstown, and my line now extends from the latter place to Fair Play. The advance of the cavalry on the right showed the enemy to be strongly posted on the Hagerstown and Williamsport road, about 1 miles from Hagerstown. On the left, the cavalry advance showed them to be in position back of Saint James' College and at Downsville. Their position runs along the high ground from Downsville to near Hagerstown. This position they are intrenching. Batteries are established on it. It is my intention to attack them to-morrow, unless something intervenes to prevent it, for the reason that delay will strengthen the enemy and will not increase my force.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 13, 1863--5 p.m.

(Received 6.40 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        In my dispatch of yesterday I stated that it was my intention to attack the enemy to-day, unless something intervened to prevent it. Upon calling my corps commanders together and submitting the question to them, five out of six were unqualifiedly opposed to it. Under these circumstances, in view of the momentous consequences attendant upon a failure to succeed, I did not feel myself authorized to attack until after I had made more careful examination of the enemy's position, strength, and defensive works. These examinations are now being made. So far as completed, they show the enemy to be strongly intrenched on a ridge running from the rear of Hagerstown past Downsville to the Potomac. I shall continue these reconnaissances with the expectation of finding some weak point, upon which, if I succeed, I shall hazard an attack. General W. F. Smith, of the advanced division of General Couch's forces, has arrived here to-day, but from the organization and condition of these troops, and the short time they have to serve, I cannot place much reliance upon them. Difficulties arising with the troops sent me whose terms of service are about expiring, respecting the dates at which they expire, I beg to be informed by the Department upon that head respecting each such regiment sent to me.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 13, 1863--9.30 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE G. MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        Yours of 5 p.m. is received. You are strong enough to attack and defeat the enemy before he can effect a crossing. Act upon your own judgment and make your generals execute your orders. Call no council of war. It is proverbial that councils of war never fight. Re-enforcements are pushed on as rapidly as possible. Do not let the enemy escape.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 14, 1863--11 a.m.
(Received 12.10 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        On advancing my army this morning, with a view of ascertaining the exact position of the enemy and attacking him if the result of the examination should justify me, I found, on reaching his lines, that they were evacuated. I immediately put my army in pursuit, the cavalry in advance. At this period my forces occupy Williamsport, but I have not yet heard from the advance on Falling Waters, where it is reported he crossed his infantry on a bridge. Your instructions as to further movements, in case the enemy are entirely across the river, are desired.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 14, 1863--1 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        The enemy should be pursued and cut up, wherever he may have gone. This pursuit may or may not be upon the rear or flank, as circumstances may require. The inner flank toward Washington presents the greatest advantages. Supply yourself from the country as far as possible. I cannot advise details, as I do not know where Lee's army is, nor where your pontoon bridges are. I need hardly say to you that the escape of Lee's army without another battle has created great dissatisfaction in the mind of the President, and it will require an active and energetic pursuit on your part to remove the impression that it has not been sufficiently active heretofore.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 14, 1863--2.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        Should you cross at Berlin, or below Harper's Ferry, your supplies for the time can be sent by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. General Meigs will, therefore, recall General Haupt and the Railroad Brigade to repair the Manassas road, so that supplies can meet you by Thoroughfare Gap or Warrenton, should you require them there. Telegraph condition of things.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 14, 1863---2.30 p.m. (Received 3.10 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Having performed my duty conscientiously and to the best of my ability, the censure of the President conveyed in your dispatch of 1 p.m. this day, is, in my judgment, so undeserved that I feel compelled most respectfully to ask to be immediately relieved from the command of this army.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 14, 1863--3 p.m.

(Received 3.15 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        My cavalry now occupy Falling Waters, having overtaken and captured a brigade of infantry 1,500 strong, 2 guns, 2 caissons, 2 battle-flags, and a large number of small-arms. The enemy are all across the Potomac.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 14, 1863--3.30 p.m. (Received 4 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        The difficulty of supplying the army in the Valley of the Shenandoah, owing to the destruction of railroad, has decided me to move by Berlin. I shall pursue and harass the retreat of the enemy with my cavalry.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 14, 1863--4.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        My telegram, stating the disappointment of the President at the escape of Lee's army, was not intended as a censure, but as a stimulus to an active pursuit. It is not deemed a sufficient cause for your application to be relieved.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 14, 1863--8.30 p.m.
(Received 9.30 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        My cavalry have captured 500 prisoners, in addition to those previously reported. General Pettigrew, of the Confederate army, was killed this morning in the attack on the enemy's rear guard. His body is in our hands. A division of my cavalry crossed the river at Harper's Ferry to-day, who will pursue and harass the retreat of the enemy and give me information of his movements. General Kelley, with an infantry force, and Averell's cavalry, have reached Williamsport. Am I authorized to detain him here to watch the Potomac while I move to Berlin?

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 15, 1863---3.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac :

        General Kelley has been ordered to cross the Potomac and act on Lee's right flank, in order to prevent raids into West Virginia. It is hoped that he may be able to do the enemy some harm there.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Berlin, Md., July 15, 1863--7 p.m.
(Received 8.40 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        The army was set in motion this morning at daylight, four corps being directed to this place and three to Harper's Ferry. The bridge at Harper's Ferry was finished yesterday over the Shenandoah, at its mouth. Will be planked by daylight to-morrow. A break in the canal at the mouth of the Monocacy delays the transfer of pontoons from Harper's Ferry to this point; but every effort is being made to repair the canal, which it is expected will be in order to-morrow.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 15, 1863--8.30 p.m.
(Received 9 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief :

        I have ordered General Couch to cover the river horn Harper's Ferry upward. Colonel [A. T.] McReynolds is picketing it with his cavalry from Harper's Ferry to Williamsport. General [D. McM.] Gregg overtook and engaged the enemy's cavalry near Charlestown this morning, taking 100 prisoners. He informs me that the enemy's infantry are moving to Winchester.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 16, 1863--10 p.m.
(Received 11.30 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        The army is concentrated at this place and Harper's Ferry, and are supplying themselves as rapidly as possible with subsistence stores, forage, and certain indispensable articles of clothing. One bridge is completed at Harper's Ferry, and one will be completed at this point by 8 a.m. to-morrow. I shall immediately cross a division of cavalry to push forward and occupy the nearest gaps to Snicker's Ga.
        The infantry corps will be moved as soon as their commanders report them ready. I shall push the army forward as rapidly as possible to Warrenton and beyond to Culpeper. I deem it proper, however, to advise you that the army is greatly exhausted by previous service, both men and animals, particularly the latter. My cavalry force, from the casualties of battle and the fatigue of service, is greatly reduced.
        The number of men is reported below 10,000; the number of horses below 7,000; of these many barely able to get along. General Pleasonton reports that a considerable number of his officers and men sent to Washington to be remounted have never returned, and that a large number sent to Frederick for the same purpose have not been able to procure horses. It is of the greatest importance that the cavalry should be placed in an efficient condition, as it is only by their prompt movements that I can obtain reliable information of the position of the enemy, and it is only by them I can guard my trains and rear. I beg leave, therefore, to urge that every exertion may be made to procure horses to remount the dismounted men and meet future contingencies.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 16, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE ARMY,
Washington:

        SIR: I have the honor herewith to transmit three battle-flags, captured from the enemy by Brigadier-General Kilpatrick's division of cavalry.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Lovettsville, July 18, 1863--7 p.m.
(Received 8.45 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Four infantry corps, the Reserve Artillery, and two divisions of cavalry have crossed the Potomac at Berlin and Harper's Ferry last evening and to-day. The rest of the army will cross to-morrow.
        The division of cavalry which was sent forward yesterday have reported the occupation of Snicker's Gap after a brisk skirmish with the enemy, taking a few prisoners, who reported themselves belonging to White's guerrillas. I send forward to-day another division, to take possession of the gaps as far as Chester Gap.
        A cavalry force, two brigades, will be sent to-morrow through Aldie to cover and guard the Orange and Alexandria Railroad to Warrenton Junction and Warrenton. I would be glad to be advised how much of the road can be protected by the troops from Washington.
        I have left Brigadier-General Lockwood, with the Maryland troops recently under his command, added to the force previously under General Naglee, making over 4,000 men in all, to hold Harper's Ferry, and directed him to report to General Couch, whom I have directed to assume command of the defense of the Upper Potomac until more definite intelligence is obtained of the movements of the enemy. I have received no intelligence of any kind of the enemy beyond the fact reported by the cavalry sent in pursuit, that he was moving on Winchester. Scouts have been sent in all directions, but none have as yet reported.
        I see by the public journals it is intimated that a part of Bragg's army has been sent to Virginia. I presume if any reliable intelligence of this fact reaches you, I shall be fully advised. My present plan is to move rapidly to Warrenton, open my communication by the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and then be governed by the position and movements of the enemy.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 18, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        You need have no fear of Bragg, Johnston, or Beauregard. Not a man will join Lee. His forces can only be re-enforced by a part of D. H. Hill's command, and even then they will be far inferior in numbers to your army.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Lovettsville, July 19, 1863--10 a.m.
(Received 10.15 a.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        I am very anxious to have a competent commander for the Second Corps, made vacant by the wounding of Hancock. The very valuable services and most efficient assistance rendered me by Brigadier-General Warren induce me to nominate him for the commission of major-general, to be assigned to the Second Corps. I consider the efficiency and spirit of this army will be greatly promoted by making this appointment, and have therefore to earnestly urge it. I would also be greatly gratified if the commission of brigadier-general could be bestowed on Col. Kenner Garrard, One hundred and forty-sixth New York Volunteers, and Col. Sidney Burbank, Second Infantry.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 19, 1863--9.30 p.m. (Received July 20, 12.50 a.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        The Twelfth, Eleventh, and Sixth Corps crossed the river today. The position of the army to-night is as follows, viz:
        The Third Corps in the vicinity of Wood Grove, the Second Corps in rear of it, and the Twelfth Corps nearly abreast of Hillsborough; the Fifth Corps in the vicinity of Purcellville, the Reserve Artillery in rear of the Fifth Corps, and the Sixth Corps at the crossing of the Lovettsville and Purcellville pike, by the Waterford and Hillsborough road. The First Corps is in the vicinity of Hamilton, and the Eleventh Corps between Waterford and Hamilton.
        It will be seen from this that the army is moving in three columns. Two divisions of cavalry are in front and on the right flank, those in front moving rapidly to overtake the enemy; a brigade in rear, and two brigades moving to protect the Orange and Alexandria Railroad.
        The information derived from our scouts represents infantry of the enemy at Front Royal on the 16th, and indicates that his army is moving up the Valley and on Culpeper. After today I shall not be in communication with the telegraph until I reach Warrenton.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


WASHINGTON, D. C., July 21, 1863--10 a.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac :

        It is reported that Hill's corps has moved back to Martinsburg, compelling Kelley to recross the Potomac at Cherry Run. General Foster applies for Brig. Gen. H. M. Naglee. He will be ordered to return to Fort Monroe and report to General Foster.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS AT LINDEN,
Crest of Manassas Gap, July 23, 1863--10 p.m.
(Received, via Harper's Ferry, Va., July 25, 8.40 a.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        On the evening of the 20th, this army was posted on the two pikes from Aldie to Winchester, the cavalry occupying Snicker's and Ashby's Gaps with slight opposition. All the information respecting the enemy indicated that he was still in position from Winchester to Martinsburg. Lest the continuance of my march should enable him to get into my rear and interrupt or interfere with my communications, I halted during the 21st, throwing forward my cavalry to Manassas and Chester Gaps. Manassas Gap my cavalry occupied, but they were driven back from Chester Gap. On the morning of the 22d, being satisfied that the enemy's army was in full movement southward toward Culpeper Court-House or Orange Court-House, I directed two corps to cover my depots at Warrenton and White Plains, and threw forward the other five corps to Manassas Gap. At daylight this morning, the Third Corps entered Manassas Gap, and, advancing beyond the crest, has been skirmishing with and driving back the enemy. At dark the enemy held a position covering the entrance to Chester Gap from Front Royal. The information respecting his army is somewhat contradictory. It is reported to me by signal officers and my cavalry to have been moving with its trains yesterday and today up the Valley of the Shenandoah, through Front Royal and Strasburg, and through Chester Gap toward Culpeper, though there are reasons for my considering it probable that but a small portion of his army has passed on. I shall attack his position covering Chester Gap to-morrow at daylight.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 23, 1863.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE G. MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        GENERAL: Brig. Gen. G. Marston has been assigned by the Secretary of War to the command of Saint Mary's District, Maryland, where he is to establish a camp for prisoners of war. You will assign to him a guard of about 300 men from New Hampshire regiments. It is reported that there are only about that number in the Second. Fifth, and Twelfth New Hampshire Volunteers. If more convenient, any other New Hampshire troops may be taken. It is intended to return these regiments to the Army of the Potomac as soon as they can be filled up with drafted men from that State.
        Any prisoners of war you may have will be turned over to General Marston, who is directed to show you his instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. W. HALLECK,
General-in. Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 24, 1863--8 p.m.
(Received, via Warrenton, July 25, 4.10 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        I last night telegraphed you that, after driving the enemy through Manassas Gap, the head of the army, consisting of the Third Corps, had reached within a few miles of Front Royal at sunset, and was in the presence of a considerable force of the enemy, with batteries in position. Prisoners taken belonged to the three several corps of the Confederate Army, and reliable intelligence was obtained of the arrival of Ewell's corps from Winchester at the close of the engagement. It was not until late in the evening that the army debouched from the pass sufficiently to deploy any larger force than the Third Corps, though this corps was followed immediately by the Fifth and Second. During the night, the Twelfth and two divisions of the Sixth were ordered up, and it was my intention, as reported to you, to attack with my whole force, in the hope of separating the force of the enemy and capturing such portions as had not reached the passes. I regret to inform you that, on advancing this morning at daylight, the enemy had again disappeared, declining battle, and though an immediate advance was made and Front Royal occupied, nothing was seen of him but a rear guard of cavalry with a battery of artillery. I then ascertained that for two days he had been retreating with great celerity, principally through Strasburg and Luray, sending through Chester Gap sufficient force to cover his flank and hold me in check in my advance through Manassas Gap. As evidence of the hurried manner in which the enemy's retreat was conducted, is the fact of his abandoning some 80 wounded in Front Royal without any supplies.
        My cavalry have been employed in harassing the enemy, having captured numerous prisoners and several herds of cattle and sheep. Finding the enemy entirely beyond my reach, I have withdrawn the army from Front Royal, through Manassas Gap, and shall concentrate it in the vicinity of Warrenton and Warrenton Junction for supplies and to establish a base of communication.
        The losses in yesterday's engagement are reported to amount to some 200 killed and wounded,(*) among the latter General Spinola. The enemy is believed to have gone to Culpeper, and probably beyond.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 25, 1863--12.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        Your telegram of 10 p.m., 23d, is just received--the first communication from you for four or five days. The Quartermaster's and Commissary Departments have been prepared to send forward supplies, but were uncertain of the position of your army. Every possible effort has been made to send remounts to your cavalry, but the destruction of horses is enormous. Every serviceable horse in the country occupied should be impressed. They only serve for guerrillas.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 25, 1863--2 p.m.
(Received 3.50 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        I have just reached Warrenton. The detachments of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Regiments New York Cavalry, alluded to in your dispatch of the 21st, will be ordered to return at once to their regiments in the vicinity of Warrenton. I take this occasion to request that the detachments of cavalry now about Washington belonging to my command may be immediately ordered to their regiments, more especially those belonging to the First Rhode Island and Twelfth Illinois Regiments.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General. Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Warrenton, July 25, 1863--7 p.m.
(Received July 26, 12.30 a.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Your telegram of 12.30 p.m. is received. I telegraphed you on the 19th instant. After that date, being away from telegraphic communication, and the guerrillas rendering the transmission of dispatches insecure, I did not telegraph till the 23d, as there was nothing particular to communicate, and nothing definite known of the enemy. When I left the Potomac River, I requested the quartermaster's and commissary departments to throw supplies to Warrenton and Warrenton Junction.
        After I found the movements of the enemy might detain me from reaching Warrenton as soon as originally expected, I requested the chief and acting chief of those departments to have a limited amount of supplies sent to White Plains, to meet contingencies. The chiefs of these departments with me were fully apprised of my views and plans as soon as they were formed. As soon as I had crossed the river, I sent two brigades of cavalry to guard the Orange and Alexandria road and its branch to Warrenton, and the very moment my army was within reach of those places, two corps were sent to guard Warrenton, Warrenton Junction, and White Plains. The service the cavalry have had to perform has been trying on horses, and the rocky character of the roads very destructive of shoes. Four corps are to-night in this vicinity; the remaining three will be in position to-morrow. My cavalry are on the Rappahannock. One division is at Amissville, beyond the Rappahannock, annoying the rear of the enemy; another at Orleans, covering the movements of the infantry. No positive intelligence has been received of the movements of the enemy.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Warrenton, July 25, 1863--7 m.
(Received 10 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        I beg leave to call your attention to my telegram of the 19th instant, making certain nominations of general officers, particularly nominating a commander for the Second Corps, and to ask whether any action has been had on the same.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 26, l863.

Major-General MEADE,
Warrenton, Va. :

        It is impossible to promote General Warren at present. There is no vacancy. I have recommended the discharge of certain useless Major-generals, but it has not been acted on. The delay in sending back detachments of cavalry results from want of horse equipments, all on hand having been sent to your army and to General Couch. Others are expected daily.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 26, 1863---8 p.m.
(Received 8.30 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief :

        How far from Alexandria can the troops from Washington guard the Orange and Alexandria Railroad? I ask, that I may direct my troops to connect with them. Do you desire or expect I should take any steps for the reoccupation of the Shenandoah Valley, now abandoned by the enemy?

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 27, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        I see no advantage in the reoccupation of the Shenandoah Valley. Lee's army is the objective point. General Heintzelman will reply in regard to his guarding the railroad.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 27, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Warrenton, Va.:

        General Heintzelman says that with his present force he cannot guard the road beyond Manassas Junction.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Warrenton, July 27, 1863.
(Received 12.15 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H.. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief

        From Warrenton Junction it is reported that artillery firing is heard in the direction of Aquia Creek and at Fredericksburg. I have sent no force in that direction. Have any been sent from Washington?

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 27, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Warrenton, Va.:

        No troops have been sent in the direction of Aquia Creek or Fredericksburg. The firing is probably from gunboats in that vicinity.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
Warrenton, July 27, 1863--4 p.m.
(Received 5.45 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

        The only object in reoccupying the Valley of the Shenandoah would be to prevent the enemy from having the benefit of the incoming crops, which last year, I understand, he employed his army in gathering, and sent to the rear for winter use. If the Valley is not occupied, would it not be well to direct the forces under General Couch to come here, and occupy and guard the railroad forming my line of communication, which, if the enemy does not make any defense of the Rapidan, will be a very long line, and will require for its security a large detachment from this army? I make this suggestion because I understood the forces under General Couch were under my general command only while my operations were in Maryland and Pennsylvania, and since crossing the Potomac I have exercised no control over them. The condition of my cavalry is such that it will, perhaps, be a day or two before I can throw a large force across the Rappahannock to ascertain the exact position of the enemy.
        Scouts report a force at Culpeper and one near Cedar Mountain, though the general impression seems to be that the main body has gone to Gordonsville.
        The Rappahannock at Sulphur Springs and below is not fordable at present, having over 4 feet of water.

GEO. O. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 27, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        The occupation of the Shenandoah is now a matter of very little importance. It is supposed that General Couch's forces, being militia, are about melted away. They would be worthless if ordered forward. General [Charles] Griffin's resignation is accepted. You will supply his place.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
Washington, D.C., July 27, 1863.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE G. MEADE,
Commanding Army of the Potomac;

Major-General HEINTZELMAN,
Commanding Department of Washington :

        GENERALS: The numerous depredations committed by citizens or rebel soldiers in disguise, harbored and concealed by citizens, along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and within our lines, call for prompt and exemplary punishment. You will, therefore, arrest and confine for punishment, or put beyond our lines, every citizen against whom there is sufficient evidence of his having engaged in these practices. You will also notify the people within 10 miles of the railroad that they will be held responsible in their persons and property for any injury done to the road, trains, depots, or stations, by citizens, guerrillas, or persons in disguise, and, in case of such injury, they will be impressed as laborers to repair all damages.
        If these measures should not stop such depredations, the entire inhabitants of the district of country along the railroad will be put across the lines and their property taken for Government uses.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 28, 1863.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS,
Adjutant-General of the Army:

        GENERAL: I have the honor herewith to transmit two additional battle-flags captured from the enemy at the battle of Gettysburg, on which are the following inscriptions, viz: First, "Captured from Eighth Florida Regiment by Sergt. Thomas Horan, Seventy-second New York (Third Excelsior) Volunteers." Second," Taken by Capt. Hugo Siedlitz, Company A, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, from a regiment of Rodes' division, Early's [Ewell's] corps."

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 28, 1863--3 p.m.
(Received 7.35 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        I am making every effort to prepare this army for an advance. The principal difficulties encountered are the passage of the Rappahannock (at present unfordable, but which will probably be bridged to-night), also the want of animals for the batteries and cavalry, to supply which the quartermaster's department is doing everything possible. The recent marches in the mountain passes and the excessive heat of the weather caused a great loss of animals and the exhaustion of many others. A large pro-portion of the animals require shoeing. It is also necessary to accumulate subsistence stores to load the trains before starting. I am in hopes to commence the movement to-morrow, when I shall first throw over a cavalry force to feel for the enemy, and cross the infantry as fast as possible. My plan is to advance on the railroad to Culpeper and as far beyond as the enemy's position will permit, to detach sufficient force to hold and guard the railroad from Manassas Junction, and thus test the question which has been raised of the capacity of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad to supply the army and the practicability of maintaining open such a long line of communication.
        No reliable intelligence of the position of the enemy has been obtained. He pickets the Rappahannock from Fredericksburg to Rappahannock Station. These pickets, however, seem to be mere "lookouts," to warn him of my approach. Some camps can be seen at Pony Mountain, near Culpeper, and in the vicinity of Cedar Mountain.
        Contradictory reports from citizens and scouts place the main body, some at Gordonsville, others say at Staunton and Charlottesville, and some assert the retreat has been extended to Richmond. My own expectation is that he will be found behind the line of the Rapidan, which, from all I can learn, presents a favorable line of defense, most of the fords being commanded by the southern bank, where his artillery can be used to advantage. If I can hold the railroad without too great a weakening of my force, and it proves to have the capacity to afford all the supplies needed, I shall advance until the enemy is encountered or definite information obtained of his movements.
        By holding the road, I do not refer to the force necessary to prevent the injuries caused by guerrillas, but against large bodies of cavalry or other forces placed on my flank and rear for the purpose of destroying my communications.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General

P. S.--4 P. M.--A scout just returned from across the river reports the enemy have repaired the railroad bridge across the Rapidan, and are using the road to Culpeper Court-House; that Lee has been re-enforced by D. H. Hill, reported with 10,000 men, and that he intends to make a stand at Culpeper or in its vicinity.


UNOFFICIAL.] HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
Washington, July 28, 1863.

Major-General MEADE
Army of the Potomac, Warrenton, Va.:

        GENERAL: I take this method of writing you a few words which I could not well communicate in any other way.
        Your fight at Gettysburg met with the universal approbation of all military men here. You handled your troops in that battle as well, if not better, than any general has handled his army during the war. You brought all your forces into action at the right time and place, which no commander of the Army of the Potomac has done before. You may well be proud of that battle. The President's order, or proclamation, of July 4, showed how much he appreciated your success. And now a few words in regard to subsequent events. You should not have been surprised or vexed at the President's disappointment at the escape of Lee's army. He had examined into all the details of sending you re-enforcements, to satisfy himself that every man who could possibly be spared from other places had been sent to your army. He thought that Lee's defeat was so certain that he felt no little impatience at his unexpected escape. I have no doubt, general, that you felt the disappointment as keenly as any one else. Such things sometimes occur to us without any fault of our own. Take it altogether, your short campaign has proved your superior Generalship, and you merit, as you will receive, the confidence of the Government and the gratitude of the country. I need not assure you, general, that I have lost none of the confidence which I felt in you when I recommended you for the command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. W. HALLECK.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 29, 1863--10 a.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Warrenton, Va.:

    The following note of the President is communicated for your information. I will write you more fully to-day:

EXECUTIVE MANSION,
July 29, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK:

        Seeing General Meade's dispatch of yesterday to yourself, causes me to fear that he supposes the Government here is demanding of him to bring on a general engagement with Lee as soon as possible. I am claiming no such thing of him. In fact, my judgment is against it; which judgment, of course, I will yield if yours and his are the contrary. If he could not safely engage Lee at Williamsport, it seems absurd to suppose he can safely engage him now, when he has scarcely more than two-thirds of the force he had at Williamsport, while it must be that Lee has been re-enforced. True, I desired General Meade to pursue Lee across the Potomac, hoping, as has proved true, that he would thereby clear the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and get some advantage by harassing him on his retreat. These being past, I am unwilling he should now get into a general engagement on the impression that we here are pressing him, and I shall be glad for you to so inform him, unless your own judgment is against it.

Yours, truly,
A. LINCOLN.


H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 29, 1863--11 a.m. (Received 11.45 a.m.)

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Much feeling exists in this army in regard to the Eleventh Corps. This consideration, in addition to my own judgment that the other corps should be increased, induces me to submit to you for approval the propriety of breaking up the organization of this corps by sending General Howard with one division to the Second Corps, which he will then command, another division to the Twelfth Corps and leaving the third division, under General Schurz, with a brigade of cavalry, to guard my rear from the Rappahannock to Manassas Junction. Please reply as soon as convenient.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 29, 1863--2.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Army of the Potomac:

        As it is quite possible that we may be obliged to detach some of your troops, to enforce the draft and to bring on the drafted men, I think it would be best to hold for the present the upper line of the Rappahannock without farther pursuit of Lee. I will telegraph you as soon as I can get a decision in regard to the Eleventh Corps.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 29, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        GENERAL: Since my dispatch of this morning, I have had a consultation with Major-General Schurz, who has presented views to me which may in some measure modify your action. I have, therefore, authorized General Schurz to see you on the manner of effecting the change proposed in such way as to be least offensive to the officers and men concerned, and I shall be very glad if the propositions of General Schurz should meet with your approval, as it is my desire to render this change as agreeable to this officer and those under his command as the interests of the public service will permit.

Respectfully, yours,
GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 30, 1863--1 p.m. (Received 3 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        Your telegrams of yesterday of 10.30 a.m. and 2 p.m. were duly received. The impression of the President is correct. I have been acting under the belief, from your telegrams, that it was his and your wish that I should pursue Lee and bring him to a general engagement, if practicable. The President, however, labors under two misapprehensions: First, I did not fail to attack Lee at Williamsport because I could not do so safely: I simply delayed the attack until, by examination of his position, I could do so with some reasonable degree of probability that the attack would be successful. He withdrew before that information could be obtained. Secondly, my army at this moment is about equal in strength to what it was at Williamsport, the re-enforcements, principally Gordon's division, from the Peninsula, which reached me at Berlin, being about equal to the losses sustained by the discharge of the nine months' men. By nine months' men, I mean those who were with the army at Gettysburg and before, and do not refer to several regiments that reported at Hagerstown, but from their disorganization were never brought to the front.
        With this preliminary explanation, and the fact that my army is now in a condition to move, it becomes necessary that the question of an advance should be definitely settled at the earliest possible moment. The solution of this question will depend in a measure on data not in my possession, such, for instance, as is referred to by you in your telegram of 2.30 p.m., viz, the withdrawal of apart of this army. So far as the question is a military one, dependent on the relative condition of the two armies. I am of the opinion that, even if Lee has been re-enforced by 10,000 men, owing to the losses sustained by him in his recent campaign, I ought still to be able to cope with him, provided he is not found in a very strong position, where the natural and artificial obstacles to be overcome are such that, with inferior or equal numbers on his part, the advantages referred to in reality make him my superior. This, of course, can only be tested or settled by an advance and coming in contact with him.
        The information as to the enemy's position and movements, as previously reported, is very meager and contradictory. I have still to rely on my own judgment and reasoning, which is, as before stated, that he will be found prepared to dispute the passage of the Rapidan, represented to be a very strong line for defense. With my pontoon bridges, the probabilities are, that, avoiding the fords, where, of course, he will be prepared to receive me, I shall be able to find some point where the commanding heights being on my side, with my artillery in position, I can force a passage; and the river once passed, his line becomes untenable. To do this, however, will require the whole force I have at present. Indeed, if it were practicable, I should desire an increase, as I shall have to leave in my rear a large detachment to guard my depots and communications.
        To conclude, therefore, in my judgment, if there were no other considerations than the relative strength and position of the two armies, I should favor an advance. Of course, you and the President will be governed by such other considerations as may exist, and your decision, when communicated, will be promptly and strictly complied with.
        Presuming, for the purposes of this paper, that it is decided not to advance, the question then arises what course is to be pursued. In your telegram of 2.30 p.m. of yesterday, you indicate holding the line of the Upper Rappahannock. I have to say, in regard to this line, that I do not consider it as offering any particular advantage, as at low stages of water the river is fordable in so many places, and with pontoon trains, which the enemy are known to possess, he can cross where it is not fordable. Hence, it will be impossible, supposing he assumes the offensive, to prevent his turning my flanks, or, as I propose to do at the Rapidan, forcing a passage at some point where he can get the command for his artillery on his side. This will, however, in a measure depend on my strength, which can only be known after you have decided how much of my force you will withdraw.
        There is one consideration to which your attention is called, and that is, in case I do not advance, what probability there is that you will be enabled to re-enforce this army more rapidly than the enemy will be his. Our past experience has shown a fertility of resource and a power over his people in bringing out men which leads me to fear that in this respect a delay will be more advantageous to him than to us, notwithstanding the exhaustion and discontent which it is known the war has produced in his country. I shall not make any movement under existing circumstances till your views and wishes are sent to me.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 30, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Warrenton, Va.:

Four regiments of infantry (not New York or Pennsylvania) will be immediately sent from the Army of the Potomac to New York Harbor, to report to General Canby. The officer in command will telegraph to the Quartermaster-General the numbers for transportation.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 30, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Warrenton, Va.:

        The troops to be sent east should number from 1,500 to 2,000. This detachment is all that it is proposed at present to take from your army: but under no circumstances can we now give you any re-enforcements. Every place has been stripped to the bare poles. Keep up a threatening attitude, but do not advance.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 31, 1863--10.30 a.m.
(Received 10.40 a.m.)

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        In compliance with your instructions of yesterday, the following regiments have been ordered to New York Harbor, to report to Brigadier-General Canby: First and Thirty-seventh Massachusetts, Fifth Wisconsin, and Twentieth Indiana; aggregate present for duty, 1,643.
        The regiments left here early this morning for Warrenton Junction, there to take railroad transportation to Washington. Owing to the large number of trains now run over the road, I presume the regiments will not reach Washington before to-night. Col. Oliver Edwards, Thirty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, commands the troops, and he has been instructed to acquaint the Quartermaster-General, by telegraph, with the strength of his command.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., July 31, 1863--8.45 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,
Warrenton, Va.:

        Capt. [S.C.] Means reports that about 500 of the enemy's cavalry have appeared at Point of Rocks. The present time should be availed of to drive out every guerrilla and disloyal man between the Potomac, Rappahannock, Blue Ridge.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


UNOFFICIAL.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 31, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,
General-in-Chief :

        MY DEAR GENERAL: I thank you most sincerely and heartily for your kind and generous letter of the 28th instant, received last evening. It would be wrong in me to deny that I feared there existed in the minds of both the President and yourself an idea that I had failed to do what another would and could have done in the withdrawal of Lee's army. The expression you have been pleased to use in your letter, to wit, "a feeling of disappointment," is one that I cheerfully accept and readily admit was as keenly felt by myself as any one. But permit me, dear general, to call your attention to the distinction between disappointment and dissatisfaction. The one was a natural feeling, in view of the momentous consequences that would have resulted from a successful attack, but does not necessarily convey with it any censure. I could not view the use of the latter expression in any other light than as intending to convey an expression of opinion on the part of the President that I had failed to do what I might and should have done. Now, let me say, in the frankness which characterizes your letter, that perhaps the President was right; if such was the case, it was my duty to give him an opportunity to replace me by one better fitted for the command of the army. It was, I assure you, with such feelings that I applied to be relieved. It was not from any personal consideration, for I have tried in this whole war to forget all personal considerations, and have always maintained they should not for an instant influence any one's actions.
        Of course you will understand that I do not agree that the President was right, and I feel sure when the true state of the case comes to be known, that however natural and great may be the feeling of disappointment, no blame will be attached to any one.
        Had I attacked Lee the day I proposed to do so, and in the ignorance that then existed of his position, I have every reason to believe the attack would have been unsuccessful, and would have resulted disastrously. This opinion is founded on the judgment of numerous distinguished officers, after inspecting Lee's vacated works and position. Among these officers I could name Generals Sedgwick, Wright, Slocum, Hays, Sykes, and others.
        The idea that Lee had abandoned his lines early in the day that he withdrew, I have positive intelligence is not correct, and that not a man was withdrawn till after dark. I mention these facts to remove the impression, which newspaper correspondents have given the public, that it was only necessary to advance to secure an easy victory. I had great responsibility thrown on me. On one side were the known and important fruits of victory, and, on the other, the equally important and terrible consequences of a defeat. I considered my position at Williamsport very different from that at Gettysburg. When I left Frederick, it was with the firm determination to attack and fight Lee, without regard to time or place, as soon as I could come in contact with him; but after defeating him, and requiring him to abandon his schemes of invasion, I did not think myself justified in making a blind attack simply to prevent his escape, and running all the risks attending such a venture. Now, as I said before, in this, perhaps, I erred in judgment, for I take this occasion to say to you, and through you to the President, that I have no pretensions to any superior capacity for the post he has assigned me to; that all I can do is to exert my utmost efforts and do the best I can; but that the moment those who have a right to judge my actions think, or feel satisfied, either that I am wanting or that another would do better, that moment I earnestly desire to be relieved, not on my own account, but on account of the country and the cause.
        You must excuse so much egotism, but your kind letter in a measure renders it necessary. I feel, general, very proud of your good opinion, and assure you I shall endeavor in the future to continue to merit it.
        Reciprocating the kind feeling you have expressed, I remain, general, most truly and respectfully, yours,

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


WASHINGTON, D.C., August 1, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,
Warrenton, Va.:

        To avoid all misunderstanding on the subject, when in the exercise of the authority conferred on you you assume command of any post or troops belonging to another department, and when you relinquish the command of any such place or troops, please notify the commanding general of that department of your action in the matter.

H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
August 1, 1863--4.30 p.m.
(Received 7.15 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        On leaving the Potomac, in view of the probability of the return of Lee or a part of his army into Maryland, I directed General Couch to assume the defense of the river from Williamsport to Harper's Ferry, and placed under his command the garrison at Harper's Ferry, under General Lockwood. My position being now so remote, and the enemy having evacuated the Valley, I have relinquished all control over General Couch, and directed General Lockwood to report to General Schenck.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
August 1, 1863--10 p.m.
(Received 11.45 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        In compliance with your instructions to occupy the line of the Upper Rappahannock, this army has to-day been placed in position from Waterloo Crossing on the right to Ellis Ford on the left. Warrenton, New Baltimore, Brentsville, and, Morrisville are all occupied, and connected with the forces on the river by pickets and patrols. The cavalry on the right flank at Amissville, picketing to the mountains; on the left, from Ellis to United States Ford on the river, thence to Aquia Creek. A brigade of cavalry is at White; Plains, scouting Occoquan. Last night and this morning bridges were thrown over the river at the railroad crossing and at Kelly's Ford. Infantry was crossed at each place, and the necessary works to protect the bridges will be constructed. The railroad bridge will be immediately repaired. At 10 a.m. this morning, Buford's cavalry division crossed at the railroad crossing, and soon encountered the enemy's cavalry. The latest report from him, just received, dated 4.30 p.m., he had driven Jones; and Hampton's brigades to within 1 miles of Culpeper, where he reports A. P. Hill's corps to be in position. He has been ordered to fall back, and hold as advanced a position in front of the Rappahannock as he can do with security.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
August 3, 1863---8 p.m.
(Received 8.50 p.m.)

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,
General-in-Chief:

        No telegram was sent yesterday, being Sunday. Late Saturday night (August 1), Buford's command of cavalry reported that, after driving the enemy's cavalry to within 16 miles of Culpeper Court-House, he was met by 5,000 infantry and three batteries of artillery, who compelled him to retire this side of Brandy Station, at which point they ceased their pursuit. Buford took up a position between the Rappahannock and Brandy Station, which he has held undisturbed yesterday and today, though at times to-day the enemy's cavalry assumed a menacing attitude, believed by General Buford an attempt to examine our position.
        The position of the army is as last reported, excepting that there are two divisions of the First Corps on the right bank of the Rappahannock, at the railroad crossing, and one brigade of cavalry posted in front of Kelly's Ford, picketing toward Stevensburg and the fords on the Lower Rapidan. The signal officer on Watery Mountain, near Warrenton, reports the disappearance of camps near Culpeper, and a movement of wagon trains from that point toward Orange Court-House.
        The cavalry on the left report no force on this side near Falmouth; but a prisoner states that Cooke's brigade, 3,000 strong, had arrived at Fredericksburg from Richmond.
        The railroad bridge over the Rappahannock was repaired to-day.

GEO. G. MEADE,
Major-General.

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